|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Fog Tropes - Gradual Requiem

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (18 ratings)
Retail
Member
Fog Tropes - Gradual Requiem album cover
01
Fog Tropes
9:56
$0.49
$0.99
02
Gradual Requiem: Part 1
6:13
$0.49
$0.99
03
Gradual Requiem: Part 2
7:22
$0.49
$0.99
04
Gradual Requiem: Part 3
9:05
$0.49
$0.99
05
Gradual Requiem: Part 4
7:44
$0.49
$0.99
06
Gradual Requiem: Part 5
3:26
$0.49
$0.99
07
Gambuh I
18:05  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 7   Total Length: 61:51

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 3 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

Three pieces, each worthy

mcwittmann

Fog Tropes is a great composition, a thick, rich piece that is embedded in a specific place, namely a harbor (it happens to be San Francisco) in the fog. Gradual Requiem continues the music that has a rich drone built into it - a heavy texture under which more is heard. The requiem is beautiful. Gambuh is the most abstract, it seems. And perhaps the most beautiful on the album.

user avatar

Jan.01.09

brighternow

Fog Tropes is for brass sextet and tape (mostly consisting of fog horns and other marine sounds of San Francisco Bay). Brass musicians of the S.F. opera. John Adams: conductor. - Gradual Requiem performed by composer with live electronics, Balinese flute (gambu), voice and mandolin (Foster Reed) - Gambuh 1 is for the Balinese flute with tape delay and synthesizer.

user avatar

Fog Tropes

markrokosmos

In my mind one of the few great pieces of the 2nd half of the 20th century. Over the last 10 years I must have listened to Fog Tropes at least 150 times. In my book, Marshall effortlessly matches the creative minds of better-known composers such as Part, Gorecki, Reich, Glass and Bryars.

They Say All Music Guide

Composed for brass sextet, fog horns and ambient textures, Marshall’s “Fog Tropes” stands in sharp contrast to his “Gradual Requiem,” a piece typified by the use of tremelando effects on its mandolins and keyboards. It also employs the gambuh, an end-blown flute descended from Bali. – Jason Ankeny