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Turn On the Bright Lights

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Turn On the Bright Lights album cover
01
Untitled
3:56  
02
Obstacle 1
4:11  
03
NYC
4:19  
04
PDA
4:59  
05
Say Hello to the Angels
4:28  
06
Hands Away
3:05  
07
Obstacle 2
3:47  
08
Stella Was a Diver and She Was Always Down
6:27  
09
Roland
3:35  
10
The New
6:07  
11
Leif Erikson
4:00  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 48:54

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eMusic Features

0

Who Is…Wymond Miles

By Hilary Hughes, Contributor

The joke is that Wymond Miles, the guitarist for San Francisco's the Fresh & Onlys, is more famous for his hair than his strumming skills. Miles's voluminous mane, which puts the girls in the Herbal Essences commercials from the '90s to shame, even has its own parody Twitter account something Miles laughs about, along with the general attention reaped by his raven locks. That's the thing about Miles: He's unassuming, a staple of San Francisco's… more »

They Say All Music Guide

One might go into a review like this one wondering how many words will pass before Joy Division is brought up. In this case, the answer is 16. Many are too quick to classify Interpol as mimics and lose out on discovering that little more than an allusion is being made. The music made by both bands explores the vast space between black and white and produces something pained, deftly penetrating, and beautiful. Save for a couple vocal tics, that’s where the obvious parallels end. The other fleeting comparisons one can one whip up when talking about Interpol are several — roughly the same amount that can be conjured when talking about any other guitar/drums/vocals band formed since the ’90s. So, sure enough, one could play the similarity game with this record all day and bring up a pile of bands. It could be a detrimental thing to do, especially when this record is so spellbinding and doesn’t deserve to be mottled with such bilge. However, this record is a special case; slaying the albatross this band has been unfairly strangled by is urgent and key. Let’s: there’s another Manchester band at the heart of “Say Hello to the Angels,” but that heart is bookended by a beginning and end that approaches the agitated squall of Fugazi; the torchy, elegiac “Leif Erikson” plays out like a missing scene from the Afghan Whigs’ Gentlemen; the upper-register refrain near the close of “Obstacle 1″ channels Shudder to Think. This record is no fun at all, the tension is rarely resolved, and — oh no! — it isn’t exactly revolutionary, though some new shades of gray have been discovered. But you shouldn’t allow your perception to be fogged by such considerations when someone has just done it for you and, most importantly, when all this brilliance is waiting to overwhelm you. – Andy Kellman

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