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Our Endless Numbered Days

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Our Endless Numbered Days album cover
01
On Your Wings
3:55
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02
Naked as We Came
2:35
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03
Cinder and Smoke
5:46
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Sunset Soon Forgotten
3:22
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05
Teeth in the Grass
2:24
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06
Love and Some Verses
3:42
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Radio War
1:58
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08
Each Coming Night
3:30
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09
Free Until They Cut Me Down
4:37
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10
Fever Dream
4:18
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11
Sodom, South Georgia
5:02
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12
Passing Afternoon
4:01
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 45:10

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

Douglas Wolk

Contributor

Douglas Wolk writes about pop music and comic books for Time, the New York Times, Rolling Stone, Wired and elsewhere. He's the author of Reading Comics: How Gra...more »

03.15.10
Iron & Wine, Our Endless Numbered Days
Label: Sub Pop Records

Every artistic cliché has a remarkable artist behind it, and the current crop of sensitive, bearded, poetic acoustic singer-songwriters has an original: Sam Beam of Iron & Wine. His second album is a hushed, perceptively observed thing, on which he and his band play as softly as they can manage, a strategy that's worked for a handful of kindred spirits over the past few decades, from Nick Drake to Elliott Smith. ("Sunset Soon Forgotten"… read more »

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love this!

woodsport

strange about this band - i absolutely love this album but haven't felt much for his other releases. this one is great.

user avatar

Comforting and Haunting at the same time

jhodges10

Great writing, and it's like he reminds us of our own mortality, but at the same time assuring us that it will be okay.

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Thanks E music

deeceeko

I have been able to try more artisits than i though imaginable because E music has included so many great artists like I & W in their availability list. Mellow, Relaxing, introspective, give this a listen.

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Best Iron and Wine...

GriffithsDavid

I usually find it a bit too relaxed - I prefer Bon Iver for my mellow-bearded-folk - but a few tracks (Naked as We Came, Cinder and Smoke and Sodom, South Georgia) hit the mark.

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FINALLY!!!

darcylove325

I am so glad that eMusic finally made Iron&Wine's albums available for download...I own every single one of them and this album in particular is on constant repeat on my mp3 player. Beautiful music!!!

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Lo-fi madness

Lint_Licker

I can thank an internet radio station for introducing me to Iron&Wine. I won't turn back! My FAVORITE track is 9. This whole album hits me in that place where it feels like time is relative and I can fix any previous mistakes by playing simple music and imagining things turned out differently.

eMusic Features

0

Who Is…Hiss Golden Messenger

By Stephen M. Deusner, Contributor

It feels odd to ask "Who is…?" of a guy who has been making music for nearly 20 years, but veteran Michael Taylor is just now finding his largest audience with Hiss Golden Messenger. It's actually his third band, following the short-lived punk group Ex-Ignota and the longer-lived San Francisco alt-country act The Court & Spark. When the latter broke up in 2007 — after four albums and nearly a decade of near-constant touring —… more »

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Iron & Wine

By Rachael Maddux, Contributor

Sam Beam has been making music as Iron & Wine for nearly a decade now. His earliest records, beginning with 2002's The Creek Drank the Cradle, were quietly potent affairs, steeped in muggy summer air and swathed in kudzu like so much of his native South Carolina. Beam sang quietly on those self-recorded albums, delivering love letters and poetic anthems in a voice that wavered somewhere between a murmur and a falsetto. Over the years,… more »

0

Six Degrees of Cat Stevens’ Tea for the Tillerman

By Andy Beta, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Cat Stevens’ Tea for the Tillerman

By Andy Beta, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

On Our Endless Numbered Days, the follow-up to 2002′s stunningly good Creek Drank the Cradle, the sound of Iron & Wine has changed but the song remains the same. No longer does Sam Beam record his intimate songs in the intimate surroundings of his home. Instead he has made the jump to the recording studio. As a result the record is much cleaner, less cocoon-like, certainly more the product of someone who has become a professional musician and not someone who just records for fun on a four-track. However, all Beam has sacrificed is sound quality. The sound of the record is still very intimate and simple, with very subtle arrangements that leave his voice and lyrics as the focal point. Luckily all the technology in the world can’t affect Beam’s voice, which still sounds like it comes right from his lips into your ear as if he were an angel perched on your shoulder. His songs are still as strong and memorable as they were on Creek, no drop off whatsoever in quality. “Naked as We Came” with sparkling melody lovely background harmonies by his sister Sarah; the aching folk ballad “Radio War,” which wouldn’t sound out of place on Prairie Home Companion, only it would be the best thing you ever heard there; the sad and sweet “Each Coming Night”; the crystalline acoustic guitar ballad “Fever Dream,” which has the kind of vocal harmony between Beam and his sister that seems to be the exclusive domain of siblings; and the soft rock CSNY “Sodom, South Georgia” are the equal of anything on Iron & Wine’s debut and match up well with anything Palace, Smog, or their ilk have done lately. A definite plus to recording in a studio and enlisting the help of outside musicians is that there is much more variety to the album and there are lots of small production touches that liven things up like the Native American chants at the close of “Cinder and Smoke,” the pedal steel guitar on “Sunset Soon Forgotten,” and the drums and tambourine on the bluesy “Free Until They Cut Me Down.” Our Endless Numbered Days is very subdued, thoughtful, melodic, and downright beautiful album and the new sound is more of a progression than a sudden shift in values, production or otherwise. Anyone who found the first album to be wonderful will no doubt feel the same about this one. Heck, you might even like it more. – Tim Sendra

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