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Woman King

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (354 ratings)
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Woman King album cover
01
Woman King
4:23
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02
Jezebel
5:09
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03
Gray Stables
3:57
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04
Freedom Hangs Like Heaven
4:03
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05
My Lady's House
3:35
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06
Evening on the Ground (Lilith's Song)
3:05
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 6   Total Length: 24:12

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His Best Work IMO

randal9

These are all terrific songs. Woman King, about as funky as I & W gets, IMO; Jezebel and My Lady's House, Beam's primo "sensitive" stuff; Grey Stables a groovin' canter; Freedom... and Evening... as rockin' as he gets and great, literate (dare i say,even philosophic, though biblical) lyrics. And, oh yeah, Sarah's harmonies give it all the genetic sweet of the Everly Brothers, or somebody.

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Tasty Little EP From Sam Beam

ZenGentleman

I just love the intimacy of Sam Beam's records. Woman King is a great song, if you aren't feeling genius of that track then go look somewhere else.

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My Lady's House

Michelin

Every Iron & Wine song has something special to offer... but "My Lady's House" is one of my favorites... the live version on "Norfolk" is the best!

eMusic Features

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By Stephen M. Deusner, Contributor

It feels odd to ask "Who is…?" of a guy who has been making music for nearly 20 years, but veteran Michael Taylor is just now finding his largest audience with Hiss Golden Messenger. It's actually his third band, following the short-lived punk group Ex-Ignota and the longer-lived San Francisco alt-country act The Court & Spark. When the latter broke up in 2007 — after four albums and nearly a decade of near-constant touring —… more »

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Iron & Wine

By Rachael Maddux, Contributor

Sam Beam has been making music as Iron & Wine for nearly a decade now. His earliest records, beginning with 2002's The Creek Drank the Cradle, were quietly potent affairs, steeped in muggy summer air and swathed in kudzu like so much of his native South Carolina. Beam sang quietly on those self-recorded albums, delivering love letters and poetic anthems in a voice that wavered somewhere between a murmur and a falsetto. Over the years,… more »

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Six Degrees of Cat Stevens’ Tea for the Tillerman

By Andy Beta, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Cat Stevens’ Tea for the Tillerman

By Andy Beta, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Anyone still hoping that Sam Beam and Iron & Wine will ever go back to the lo-fi sound of their first album might as well give up on that pipe dream. On the 2005 EP Woman King, Iron & Wine’s sound is more produced and varied than ever. The record’s arrangements are overflowing with a wealth of percussion, vocal harmonies, banjos, violins, and pianos. Beam’s vocals, while always a thing of beauty, sound more assured and powerful than ever. Iron & Wine sound like a real band here; if you heard them in a big-budget Hollywood film, you wouldn’t even flinch. The widening and smoothing of the band’s approach does Beam’s songs great favors, too. While his songwriting is as emotionally direct and haunting as ever (no amount of studio sheen could change that), this EP never feels insular, as his previous albums sometimes did. It sounds widescreen and universal. Woman King is too short to be considered the high point of Iron & Wine’s career — it certainly points in that direction, though. – Tim Sendra

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