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Hot Buttered Soul

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (161 ratings)

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Hot Buttered Soul album cover
01
Walk On By
12:02  
02
Hyperbolicsyllabicsesquedalymistic
9:39  
03
One Woman
5:10  
04
By The Time I Get To Phoenix
18:42  
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 4   Total Length: 45:33

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

Ron Wynn

Contributor

04.22.11
Isaac Hayes, Hot Buttered Soul
2000 | Label: Fantasy / Stax

With this landmark 1969 release, Isaac Hayes not only established his stylistic identity and importance as a solo artist, he helped usher African-American popular music into the album era. Though it was not his debut album as some have stated, Hot Buttered Soul was his first major work outside the successful songwriting partnership he had established with David Porter. Hayes abandoned the previously dominant three-minute love song format, instead opting for an elaborate production with… read more »

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Better than the theme from Shaft

Gorrck

Pop this on and your afternoon will be mellow. I have this on vinyl as well and the 18 minutes of "By the time I get to Phoenix" is just pure magic. You'd have to question your soul if this album doesn't move something within you.

user avatar

Amazon

burdt

the missing track is on amazon music too, for 99 cents.

user avatar

tema 1 ???

Merluza

no me parece que sea Isaac....que opinan'?

user avatar

Hot indeed

Slowbuildings

It seems a lot of emusic albums are given the title 'classic', and in their own way they probably are. 'HBS' is however a rarity; sweeping strings, funky bass, and the voice...a truly amazing listen.

user avatar

No MP3 Downloads in UK

hairybaroque

I'm very sad that Mr Hayes has left us; irreplaceable! I'm not too happy that the "One Woman" track is kept from us, we haven't yet got an MP3 download service on Amazon.co.uk (Why not?) and the other mp3 sites betray similar eccentricities. Please, eMusic, even if it's fuzzy, please may we have it to download? In memory of a good man?

user avatar

Get It Anyway

suddenchad

Rather than bitch about the missing track, we ought to be thankful to e-music for giving us the 12 minute and 18 minute tracks each as single downloads, unlike other services I won't name that have these as "album only" tracks. You want "One Woman?" (And you should--it's one of the great "cheating" songs of all time, much better than "Me and Mrs. Jones." ("One Woman's making my home, while the other woman is making me do wrong.")) Go to Amazon's MP3 download service and get it for 99 cents. If you don't think "Hot Buttered Soul" is worth 99 cents plus whatever three tracks on e-music cost depending on your plan, then why should you even care if there are missing songs?

user avatar

Classic album - essential in any library

babalu

I heard By The Time I Get To Phoenix in the wee hours of a Coconut Grove morning on a radio program called Music for Mushrooms and Night People when it first came out. An amazing experience. Also had the privilege of interviewing him for the college newspaper a year or two later and found him to be an incredibly humble and modest musician and man, in addition to creating some classic music. Should be in every collection.

user avatar

why keep putting this in featured titles?

RssAddict

it's broken! one of the tracks is missing and has been for at least a year! why taunt us so?

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RIP

MEEVAN

Thank you Isaac, for everything.

user avatar

Isaac Hayes' Defining Legacy..

groovelikeuluvparis

Isaac Hayes passed away today at the age of 65 at his home in Memphis. He was an icon, pure and simple and this album is his defining masterpiece. Soul music was forever changed with "Hot Buttered Soul" and the change was a welcome one. With this album, soul music proved it could be an art form just as magnificent and monumental as rock and pop. It opened up a world of possiblities soul artists like Curtis Mayfield, Minnie Riperton, Diana Ross, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, The Stylistics, The O'Jays and many others would capitalize on over the next half decade, and, in turn, affect r&b, soul, and hip-hop artists up to this very day. It effectively killed the three-minute rule labels like Atlantic and Motown clung desperately to, showing that the record-buying public would definately support a longer-formatted "concept" style Soul album if it was one worth listening to. Listen and I'm sure you'll agree, modern Soul music started here. --- Rest In Peace, Brother Isaac!

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They Say All Music Guide

Released at the tail end of the ’60s, Hot Buttered Soul set the precedent for how soul would evolve in the early ’70s, simultaneously establishing Isaac Hayes and the Bar-Kays as major forces within black music. Though not quite as definitive as Black Moses or as well-known as Shaft, Hot Buttered Soul remains an undeniably seminal record; it stretched its songs far beyond the traditional three-to-four-minute industry norm, featured long instrumental stretches where the Bar-Kays stole the spotlight, and it introduced a new, iconic persona for soul with Hayes’ tough yet sensual image. With the release of this album, Motown suddenly seemed manufactured and James Brown a bit too theatrical. Surprising many, the album features only four songs. The first, “Walk on By,” is an epic 12-minute moment of true perfection, its trademark string-laden intro just dripping with syrupy sentiment, and the thumping mid-tempo drum beat and accompanying bassline instilling a complementary sense of nasty funk to the song; if that isn’t enough to make it an amazing song, Hayes’ almost painful performance brings yet more feeling to the song, with the guitar’s heavy vibrato and the female background singers taking the song to even further heights. The following three songs aren’t quite as stunning but are still no doubt impressive: “Hyperbolicsyllabicsequedalymistic” trades in sappy sentiment for straight-ahead funk, highlighted by a stomping piano halfway through the song; “One Woman” is the least epic moment, clocking in at only five minutes, but stands as a straightforward, well-executed love ballad; and finally, there’s the infamous 18-minute “By the Time I Get to Phoenix” and its lengthy monologue which slowly eases you toward the climactic, almost-orchestral finale, a beautiful way to end one of soul’s timeless, landmark albums, the album that transformed Hayes into a lifelong icon. – Jason Birchmeier

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