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To Be Continued

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To Be Continued album cover
01
Monologue: Ike's Rap I
3:58  
02
Our Day Will Come
5:27  
03
The Look of Love
11:13  
04
Medley: Monologue / You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin
15:33  
05
Runnin' Out of Fools
5:52  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 5   Total Length: 42:03

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right an wrong

screamingmonk2

the other reviewer was correct to say that this is one of "the Hazes'" best, but there were 4 "symphonic" albums. HOT BUTTERED SOUL, MOVEMENT, BLACK MOSES and TO BE CONTINUED. and let;s not forget the greatest psuedo-jazz album ever recorded, SHAFT. once you get past the super hip title tune, Ike just cools everything out and blows you away.

user avatar

To Be Continued...

A449

If you only download one Isaac Hayes album, make it this one. This is the third of Hayes' three 'symphonic' albums, showcasing jazz influenced versions of standard tunes with full orchestra. Top of the pile on this one just has to be the medley of Hayes' own 'Ike's Mood' and You've Lost That Loving Feeling'. Without doubt, one of his best works - at least IMHO.

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They Say All Music Guide

Released in late 1970 on the heels of two chart-topping albums, Hot Buttered Soul (1969) and The Isaac Hayes Movement (also 1970), Isaac Hayes and the Bar-Kays retain their successful approach on those landmark albums for To Be Continued, another number one album. Again, the album features four songs that span far beyond traditional radio-friendly length, featuring important mood-establishing instrumental segments just as emotive and striking as Hayes’ crooning. Nothing here is quite as perfect as “Walk on By,” and the album feels a bit churned out, but To Be Continued no doubt has its share of highlights, the most notable being “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’.” The album’s most epic moment opens with light strings and horns, vamping poetically for several minutes before Hayes even utters a breath; then, once the singer delivers the song’s orchestral chorus, the album hits its sentimental peak — Hayes elevating a common standard to heavenly heights once again. Elsewhere, “Our Day Will Come” features a nice concluding instrumental segment driven by a proto-hip-hop beat that proves just how ahead of his time Hayes was during his early-’70s cycle of Enterprise albums. It’s tempting to slight this album when holding it up against Hayes’ best albums from this same era, but a comparison such as this is unfair. Even if Ike isn’t doing anything here that he didn’t do on his two preceding albums — Hot Buttered Soul, The Isaac Hayes Movement — and isn’t quite as daring as he is on his two successive albums — Black Moses, Shaft — To Be Continued still topples any Hayes album that came after 1971. It didn’t top the R&B album chart for 11 weeks on accident — this is quintessential early-’70s Isaac Hayes, and that alone makes it a classic soul album. – Jason Birchmeier

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