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Please, Please, Please

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Please, Please, Please album cover
01
Please, Please, Please
Artist: James Brown and the Famous Flames
2:47
$0.79
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02
Chonnie-On-Chon
2:14
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03
Hold My Baby's Hand
2:14
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04
I Feel That Old Feeling Coming On
2:36
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05
Just Won't Do Right
2:36
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06
Baby Cries Over The Ocean
2:37
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07
I Don't Know
2:49
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08
Tell Me What I Did Wrong
Artist: James Brown and the Famous Flames
2:24
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09
Try Me
2:34
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10
That Dood It
2:29
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11
Begging Begging
2:55
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12
I Walked Alone
2:44
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13
No No No No
2:16
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14
That's When I Lost My Heart
2:52
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15
Let's Make It
2:28
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16
Love Or A Game
2:15
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 16   Total Length: 40:50

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

eMusic Features

0

Six Degrees of Can’s Tago Mago

By Michelangelo Matos, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Can’s Tago Mago

By Michelangelo Matos, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Icon: James Brown

By Douglas Wolk, Contributor

Every James Brown show began with a hypeman introducing the star of the show, rattling off a list of his latest hits and heroic epithets: "Mr. Dynamite! The amazing Mr. 'Please, Please 'himself! He's universally known as Soul Brother Number One!" That may have put the case too mildly. He toured and recorded ceaselessly for half a century; in the decade bookended by 1965's genre-redefining "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag" and 1974's zeitgeist-assessing "Funky… more »

0

Icon: James Brown

By Douglas Wolk, Contributor

Every James Brown show began with a hypeman introducing the star of the show, rattling off a list of his latest hits and heroic epithets: "Mr. Dynamite! The amazing Mr. 'Please, Please 'himself! He's universally known as Soul Brother Number One!" That may have put the case too mildly. He toured and recorded ceaselessly for half a century; in the decade bookended by 1965's genre-redefining "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag" and 1974's zeitgeist-assessing "Funky… more »

0

Six Degrees of Rick James’s Street Songs

By Sean Fennessey, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Rick James’s Street Songs

By Sean Fennessey, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Public Enemy’s It Takes A Nation of Millions…

By Christopher R. Weingarten, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Public Enemy’s It Takes A Nation of Millions…

By Christopher R. Weingarten, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of DJ Shadow’s Endtroducing

By Michelangelo Matos, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of DJ Shadow’s Endtroducing

By Michelangelo Matos, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Though James Brown and His Famous Flames had scored an R&B Top Ten hit in 1956 with “Please, Please, Please,” and Brown’s next nine singles for Federal Records flopped but the next, “Try Me,” his third single of 1958, scored. That was when King Records (Federal’s parent label) assembled this, Brown’s debut album, out of some of those singles sessions. You can hear the sound of a group and its enthusiastic singer looking for a hit, sometimes in the rock & roll of “Chonnie-On-Chon” (1957) or the 1956 B-side “I Feel That Old Feeling Coming On,” sometimes by remaking “Please, Please, Please” under another name, such as “I Don’t Know” (1956), sometimes by tackling Coasters-like novelty material such as “That Dood It” (1958), sometimes by aping the smooth Sam Cooke, as on the 1958 B-side “That’s When I Lost My Heart,” and once by rewriting “My Bonnie (Lies over the Ocean)” as the 1958 B-side “Baby Cries over the Ocean.” Only the two hits were really memorable, but the album presented the sound of a major star-to-be in search of his sound. [Originally released in 1959. Please Please Please was reissued on a Japanese import CD in 2003.] – William Ruhlmann

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