|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Vol. 3... Life And Times Of S. Carter

Rate It! Avg: 3.0 (6 ratings)
Retail
Member
Vol. 3... Life And Times Of S. Carter album cover
01
Hova Song
2:21
$0.49
$0.99
02
So Ghetto
4:01
$0.79
$1.29
03
Do It Again (Put Ya Hands Up)
4:39
$0.79
$1.29
04
Dope Man
4:04
$0.49
$0.99
05
Things That U Do
4:52
$0.79
$1.29
06
It's Hot (Some Like It Hot)
4:15
$0.49
$0.99
07
Snoopy Track
4:02
$0.49
$0.99
08
S. Carter
4:14
$0.49
$0.99
09
Pop 4 Roc
4:36
$0.49
$0.99
10
Watch Me
4:34
$0.49
$0.99
11
Big Pimpin'
4:37
$0.79
$1.29
12
There's Been A Murder
3:40
$0.49
$0.99
13
Come And Get Me
5:48
$0.49
$0.99
14
Nymp
4:01
$0.49
$0.99
15
Hova Song
10:18  
Album Information
EXPLICIT // EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 15   Total Length: 70:02

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Wondering Sound

Review 0

Avatar Image
Sean Fennessey

Contributor

Director of Merchandising, emusic.com

11.16.10
Risky and hugely rewarding
1999 | Label: Def Jam/RAL

Keenly aware of his surging fame, and savvy about managing his image, Jay-Z made artistic leaps on Vol. 3… Life and Times of S. Carter that don't immediately reveal themselves. At first this feels like that album that has "Big Pimpin'". But there's a pan-regionalism and a sneaky repositioning at work that is both risky and hugely rewarding.

Once rappers get famous, they tend to overcompensate for the completion of their narrative — rags-to-riches-to-too-many-riches. By, Vol.… read more »

Write a Review 0 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

Recommended Albums

eMusic Features

1

Songs for Telegraph Avenue

By Sam Adams, Contributor

Archy Stallings and Nat Jaffe, the central characters in Michael Chabon's sprawling Telegraph Avenue, love nothing more than records; listening to them, talking about them, savoring the whisper of an LP as it slides out of its sleeve. But for all the music it name-checks the novel, which revolves around the two owners of Oakland's rapidly obsolescing Brokeland Records, lacks its own soundtrack. So eMusic has thoughtfully provided one, syncing an album to each of… more »

0

Six Degrees of Illmatic

By Jayson Greene, Managing Editor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

After the crossover success of 1998′s Vol. 2: Hard Knock Life (complete with highly publicized samples from Annie), Jay-Z returned to the streets on his fourth proper album overall, 1999′s Vol. 3: Life and Times of S. Carter. A set of hard-hitting tracks with some of the best rhymes of Jay-Z’s career, the album is much more invigorating than its predecessor, and almost as consistently entertaining as his best album, In My Lifetime, Vol. 1. As good as his rapping has become, the production here plays a large part as well. Befitting his superstar status, Jay-Z boasts the cream of hip-hop producers: Timbaland (four tracks total), DJ Premier, Swizz Beatz, and Rockwilder. DJ Premier’s “So Ghetto,” Timbaland’s “Snoopy Track” (with Juvenile), and DJ Clue’s “Pop 4 Roc” are innovative tracks that push the rhymes along but never intrude too much on Jay-Z’s own flow. If this album doesn’t quite make it up to Jay-Z’s best, though, it’s the fault of a few overblown productions, like “Dope Man” and “Things That U Do” (with Mariah Carey). [Vol. 3: Life and Times of S. Carter, Rovi – John Bush

more »