|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

His Greatest Hits Vol. II (LIVE)

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (149 ratings)
Retail
Member
His Greatest Hits Vol. II (LIVE) album cover
01
Stone Free (Live)
10:47  
02
Hear My Train A Comin' (Live)
8:31
$0.49
$0.99
03
I Don't Live Today (Live)
6:52
$0.49
$0.99
04
Red House (Live)
8:32
$0.49
$0.99
05
Foxy Lady (Live)
5:28
$0.49
$0.99
06
Star Spangled Banner & Smashing Of Amps (Live)
5:43
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information
LIVE

Total Tracks: 6   Total Length: 45:53

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 16 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

audio quality report

tn-rudeboy

Encoder [LAME3.96] Encoder Options [--preset fast standard -b128] Average Bitrate [186 kbps vbr]

user avatar

Good Live Hendrix

tn-rudeboy

This is a typical live Hendrix performance filled with great guitar sounds played by a master. I especially like the nearly 11 minute "Stone Free" jam, but everything on this album is first rate. The music is worthy of five stars, but I am giving this four stars because of the relatively poor bit rate. The average bit rate for these six tracks is around 186, and by today's standards thats simply not acceptable.

user avatar

This is IT!!

permafrost154

Wonderful! The only Hendrix worth downloading on emusic (Canada). So do it now, man, because "The Story of Life is quicker than the wink of an eye, The Story of Love is Hello and Goodbye."

user avatar

it may be bootleg but it's JIMI

ugaboy5

it may not be the greatest it may not be authorized it may be a bootleg recording but it is JIMI AND IT IS GREAT just to hear different live versions of some of JIMI'S hits is quite refreshing if you're into JIMI at all you know all his live recordings were an expression of the way JIMI felt right then not some polyester rehearsed every gig sounds the same version of his songs and yes HEAR MY TRAIN ACOMIN IS ALL JIMI thanks e music for this rare glimpse of JIMI'S brilliance

user avatar

jimilive

.k

listening to him play live make you wonder what was going on outside the club that night.

user avatar

Preview, preview, preview

Funkifized

What a bunch of morons. There are different versions of Jimi doing Star Spangled Banana. Use the preview buttons. If the only thing you know about Hendrix is the Woodstock recordings, then you're not enough of a real fan to warrant this recording. You deserve what you get; this is brilliant stuff.

user avatar

Not the Star Spangled Banner

diggsc

There's no rhyme or reason to call track 6 "Star Spangled Banner" except to confuse. This is not the recording that comes to mind with that title, and it in no way constitutes more than three notes of the SSB.

user avatar

Live Boot

BigD-Bluez

This is a live bootleg, but just download Hear My Train A'Coming and Red House first - they are outstanding. This version of Hear My Train was on the Rainbow Bridge LP and is amongst Jimi's finest live recordings. The rest are more dicey.

user avatar

do you really, really love jimi?

goldandrose

stop whining! if you really love jimi, you are hungry for any recordings because if you know his work, you know he personalized every performance. ok so some tracks are not "professionally finished or may have recording problems, but i don't care...i will take any jimi i can find, there is always his little asides that he says to his audience-he talks to us with humor or irony and i will take the recording blemishes along with the beauty.

user avatar

Foxy Lady

emaildropbox

I only downloaded this one track. It is a live recording but it sounds pretty good, close to what I am used to hearing.

eMusic Features

0

Lenny Kaye Walks Through Hendrix’s Last Years

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

Loaves and fishes. Out of a foreshortened lifeline and a relatively small body of work, it seems there is no end to the many miracles wrought by Jimi Hendrix to feed our insatiable hunger to hear every lick he played. For someone who did his fair share of burning the candle at both ends, as well as in the middle, he never lost sight of his work ethic and fascination with music's byways — ceaselessly… more »

2

Six Degrees of The Isley Brothers’ 3 + 3

By Dan Epstein, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

2

Six Degrees of The Isley Brothers’ 3 + 3

By Dan Epstein, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Icon: Jimi Hendrix

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

Jimi Hendrix stands at the apex of 20th century guitarists, atop the pyramid of a hundred-year span in which that simple stringed instrument became the defining sound tool of several musical generations. In one left-handed upside-down human, all the innovations and genres that the guitar helped engender came together in a solo career that lasted, surprisingly, less than half a decade. He bridged blues, folk, rock and jazz; acoustic filigree and electric feedback; showmanship, sprawling… more »

0

Icon: Jimi Hendrix

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

Jimi Hendrix stands at the apex of 20th century guitarists, atop the pyramid of a hundred-year span in which that simple stringed instrument became the defining sound tool of several musical generations. In one left-handed upside-down human, all the innovations and genres that the guitar helped engender came together in a solo career that lasted, surprisingly, less than half a decade. He bridged blues, folk, rock and jazz; acoustic filigree and electric feedback; showmanship, sprawling… more »