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Escape From New York

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (25 ratings)
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Escape From New York album cover
01
Main Title
3:53
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02
The Bank Robbery
3:30
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03
"Prison Introduction"
0:20
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04
Over the Wall/Airforce One
2:23
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05
He's Still Alive/Romero
2:12
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06
"'Snake' Plissken"
1:41
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07
Orientation
1:47
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08
"Tell Him"
1:46
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09
Engulfed Cathedral [Debussy]
3:33
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10
Across the Roof
1:17
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11
Descent into New York
3:37
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12
Back to the Pod -- Version No.1
1:34
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13
Everyone's Coming to New York
2:24
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14
"Don't Go Down There! "
0:19
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15
Back to the Pod -- Version No.2/The Crazies Come Out
2:09
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16
"I Heard You Were Dead! "
0:08
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17
Arrival at the Library
1:06
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18
"You Are the Duke of New York"
0:16
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19
Duke Arrives/Barricade
3:35
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20
President at the Train
2:28
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21
"Who Are You?"
0:27
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22
Police Action
2:27
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23
Romero and the President
1:43
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24
President Is Gone
1:53
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25
69th Street Bridge
2:44
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26
Over the Wall
3:42
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27
"The Name Is Plissken"
0:25
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28
Snake Shake - End Credits
3:58
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 28   Total Length: 57:17

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user avatar

Escape From New York

memyselfandahhhhhh

This is the John Carpenter soundtrack that stands above all others to me. It is pure and somewhat minimalist and sets a tone and mood better than any soundtrack in the last 20 years. There is no question where the story takes place and that this is not a feel good movie. To the point of his skill. This was a pinnacle where his talent was strong and raw and his tool kit wouldn't be full of many of the flourishes that would water down some of his later work. As a huge fan of the original release this gives greater scope to the effort with the extra tracks some of which are quite good. Some of it I could have done without and I'm not sure the added dialoge raises the enjoyability any. But still very glad to own this release.

user avatar

28 credits??

Steeler

1/4 of the tracks on this album are 20 seconds or less of dialouge from the movie, and you're telling me they count those as a credit each? I clicked on one by accident and lost a download on a 25 second track.

user avatar

A Great Deal?

Dylan

Back to 28 credits?

user avatar

A Great Deal

NoirMan

I love this soundtrack/score and simply want to mention that EMusic got this one right...only charging 12 credits! Great Job! I highly recommend this work from John Carpenter...great mood-music and funny quote-lines, too! An Excellent Deal!

user avatar

WTF

melmacmpf

Unavailable for download in Brazil. To me, this doesn't seem to be a likely canditate for illegal downloads, anyway. Go figure!

eMusic Features

2

Six Degrees of Araabmuzik’s Electronic Dream

By Andy Battaglia, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

2

Six Degrees of Araabmuzik’s Electronic Dream

By Andy Battaglia, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

John Carpenter is a rarity among film directors in that he is also a composer who writes the musical scores for his movies. Carpenter’s 1981 film Escape from New York was a kind of genre hybrid, a science fiction crime thriller with suggestions of a spaghetti Western thrown in. Set in a near future when Manhattan has been converted into a no-man’s-land prison, the movie needed an appropriately futuristic soundtrack, and Carpenter came up with a score for synthesizer that he played with his sound designer, Alan Howarth. Despite the instrumentation, however, the composer retained a style familiar from such earlier works as Halloween. He favored simple, repetitive keyboard figures, generally two per sequence, set in a fast-slow counterpoint. The Escape from New York score had a few changes of pace, notably a borrowing from Debussy and an ersatz Broadway show tune, “Everyone’s Coming to New York” (“Shoot a cop with a gun/The Big Apple is plenty of fun”), written by Nick Castle, but most of the music sounded like earlier Carpenter scores, similarly creating a tense, ominous tone much of the time. The high-tech sound was sometimes at odds with the bombed-out sets in the film, but it helped maintain a tense mood in a movie that sometimes threatened to become comical because it was so stylized. Two decades later, when the soundtrack was reissued on an expanded CD, the synth sound was no longer futuristic but very much of its early-’80s time. Howarth, who had constructed the original 37-minute LP, re-edited and retitled the previously released material and came up with an additional 20 minutes’ worth of cues and excerpts from the film’s arch dialogue. There was music from two cut scenes and an unused closing-credit theme, all of it in a consistent style with the previously heard material. – William Ruhlmann

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