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The Dance Of Death & Other Plantation Favorites

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The Dance Of Death & Other Plantation Favorites album cover
01
Wine and Roses
3:28  
02
How Long
2:55  
03
On the Banks of the Owchita
3:52  
04
Worried Blues
2:24  
05
What the Sun Said
10:11  
06
Revelation on the Banks of the Pawtuxent
2:35  
07
Poor Boy
3:19  
08
Variations on the Coocoo
4:00  
09
The Last Steam Engine Train
2:18  
10
Give me Corn Bread When I'm Hungry
3:12  
11
Dance of Death
7:39  
12
Tulip (aka When you Wore a Tulip and I Wore a Big Red Rose)
2:43  
13
Daisy (aka A Bicycle Built for Two)
1:20  
14
The Siege of Sevastopol
1:22  
15
Steel Guitar Rag
2:10  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 15   Total Length: 53:28

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Quintessential Fahey

seadiva

I heard parts of this album when it first came out as background to an art school film, sought it out and love it to this day. I have owned as vinyl, tape and cd. I think it is quintessential Fahey for me along with with Death Chants and Vol. 4. You can't go wrong with most of his other work.Too bad he was close to death himself before his work got the wider spread respect it deserves.

eMusic Features

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Revering Revenant Records

By John Morthland, Contributor

You can't say Revenant Records doesn't do right by its artists. Consider Exhibit A, the label's spectacular Grammy-winning box set, Screamin 'and Hollerin 'the Blues - The Worlds Of Charley Patton. There's a copy sitting on the corner of my desk right now - taking up more space than the Compact Oxford English Dictionary, I might add. The box's binder, the kind that used to hold the 78 rpm records that made up an "album,"… more »

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Preachin’ the Blues

By Mike McGonigal, Contributor

"Yes, I'm gonna get me religion, I'm gonna join the Baptist Church/ You know I wanna be a Baptist preacher, just so I won't have to work" — Son House, "Preachin 'the Blues" Blues singers recorded dozens of superb gospel sides during the commercial recording heyday of the '20s and '30s, and later during the folk and blues revival of the late '50s and early '60s. Many blues singers had gospel songs in their repertoire, but… more »

They Say All Music Guide

The title The Dance of Death and Other Plantation Favorites might lead some to believe that this is a collection of public-domain items that go back to the Deep South of the 19th century. However, while this 1964 session does contain a song titled “Dance of Death,” most of the material (including that tune) was written by Fahey himself in the early 1960s. So an intriguing title is simply that: an intriguing title. Nonetheless, Fahey’s music does have strong southern roots. Unaccompanied, the acoustic guitarist/instrumentalist demonstrates his love of African-American blues as well as the Anglo-American country, folk, and hillbilly music of Appalachia. This is essentially a folk album, but a folk album with strong country and blues leanings; in fact, numbers like “Worried Blues” and “Revelation on the Banks of the Pawtuxent” incorporate the slide guitar technique that came from Mississippi Delta blues. Not that Fahey limits himself to American influences — Appalachian music is a descendent of British, Scottish, and Irish music, and Fahey is hardly unaware of its European heritage. Further, Indian raga is an influence on the Fahey piece “On the Banks of the Owchita.” Reissued on CD in 1999 with four bonus tracks (including an interpretation of “Steel Guitar Rag”), this album makes it clear that even back in 1964 Fahey was quite original. – Alex Henderson

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