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Live, Love, Larf & Loaf

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Live, Love, Larf & Loaf album cover
01
Wings a la Mode
2:42
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02
Killerman Gold Posse
1:45
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03
Where's the Money?
3:52
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04
Hai Sai Oji-San
2:42
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05
Drowned Dog Black Night
6:48
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06
Surfin' U.S.A.
2:19
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07
Drumbo Ogie
5:39
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08
Blind Step Away
3:06
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09
Tir-Nan-Darag
5:23
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10
Disposable Thoughts
2:55
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11
Bird in God's Garden
5:43
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12
Lost and Found
5:04
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13
Same Thing
6:58
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 54:56

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some brilliant moments

freeimprov

For fans of the musicians, this is probably essential for Henry Kaiser fans but not for Richard Thompson fans (Fred Frith fans, I dunno... it's awfully pop for him. And are there people out there actively seeking non-Beefheart stuff from John French?). It's inconsistent, but some moments are positively glorious. Killerman Gold Posse and Drowned Dog Black Knight are prime RT that would be classics if they were on one of his regular albums. Bird in God's Garden highlights Frith's brilliance and brings out a rare religious mood from RT. Hai Sai Oji-San is a lot of fun, and Surfin' USA is a hilarious trainwreck. Worth the credits, seriously.

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In God's Garden

DryEraser

Bird in God's Garden has been fascinating me for years now. I would also point to classical Persian music if you like the track. One can get an incredible stream of Persian music on radiodarvish.com

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Artists Get Their Pop On!

BeckoningChasm

This is a wonderful set of pop songs, played by a crew of folks best known for their art-rock or free jazz music. Just goes to show the value of a good song. The only blot on the escutcheon is "Surfin USA"--like the rest, it's played with beauty and precision, but with a sneer of condescension that's quite off-putting. Hey guys, it's possible to make any song sound stupid, let's hope no one does it to you in ten years. Other than that one quibble, this is a must-have for fans of these folks, as well as anyone who likes adventurous guitar pop. Bravo!

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livinglovinglistening

OverTheHill

Great album with an eclectic mix of influences. Thanks eMusic for digging up another gem. Like the previous reviewer I am also a Thompson fan, but also Beefheart & Cow follower. My old vinyl copy of this album has been around the world,so I am happy to pick up the mp3 copy. Almost as happy with this as I was with finding Stump's "A fierce pancake" available!

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well alright!

youthwrkr

see also "eclectic" Being a Thompson fan, I'm partial to his contributions but this is a really interesting listen and I'd recommend giving it all a try. "Drowned Dog" is a great guitar workout and "Bird in God's Garden" is my favorite track. NOTE - a couple of these songs are incorrectly labled - "Bird in God's Garden" for example is actually song 11 and not song 12 which is a drum solo - most of the rest seem ok - it's a shame songs seem to get mislabled like this sometimes on emusic - but hey the price is right and this is great improvisational avant pop.

They Say All Music Guide

Richard Thompson once joked that if his presence on an album with John French, Fred Frith, and Henry Kaiser was expected to help it appeal to a wider audience, it didn’t say much for the state of their careers. But while French Frith Kaiser Thompson was hardly a supergroup to rival Blind Faith or the Traveling Wilburys at the turnstiles, on Live, Love, Larf & Loaf, the slightly bent wit and angular guitar figures of Richard Thompson’s signature brand of folk-rock certainly added a spoonful of sugar that helped the avant-leaning art rock of Henry Kaiser, Fred Frith, and John French go down more easily. While “Drowned Dog Black Night” and “A Blind Step Away” are very much in the mould of Thompson’s dour but graceful style, “Killerman Gold Posse” is a gleefully cynical little number everyone on board seems to have fun with, and Thompson’s guitar work adds a touch of buffering to the more severe edges of Kaiser’s often frenetic fretboard runs. And while the presence of Henry Cow founder Fred Frith is a bit restricted by his role as bassist, he does get a chance to shine on the admirably chaotic “Where’s the Money?,” and onetime Captain Beefheart percussionist John French (aka Drumbo) adds plenty of color and texture while holding down the beat. Besides, it’s not every day that you get to hear a crew like this lay into “Surfin’ U.S.A.,” or warble “Hai Sai Oji-San,” which the liner notes helpfully inform “is sung in the Okinawan language.” A oddball delight from four truly gifted musicians. – Mark Deming

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