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Boom Boom - The Very Best Of John Lee Hooker

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Boom Boom - The Very Best Of John Lee Hooker album cover
01
Boom Boom
2:34
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02
Dimples
2:14
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03
Crawlin' King Snake
2:42
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04
Black Snake Blues
3:33
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05
Tupelo Blues
3:25
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06
Little Wheel
2:35
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07
I'm In The Mood
2:43
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08
Baby Lee
2:52
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09
Trouble Blues
2:46
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10
Boogie Chillun
2:36
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11
Water Boy
3:02
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12
I Got A Letter
3:27
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13
Good Mornin' Lil' School Girl
3:41
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14
Bundle Up And Go
2:16
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15
Church Bell Tone
3:45
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16
Drug Store Woman
2:49
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17
Union Station Blues
2:57
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18
Louise Louise
3:05
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19
Sugar Mama
3:15
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20
Blues Before Sunrise
3:52
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21
Behind The Plow
4:23
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22
How Long Blues
2:16
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23
Maudie
2:18
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Ramblin' By Myself
3:20
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25
High Priced Woman
2:44
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 25   Total Length: 75:10

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Where Did the Blues Begin?

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