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Johnnie Temple Vol. 1 1935-1938

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Johnnie Temple Vol. 1 1935-1938 album cover
01
Lead Pencil Blues
3:07
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02
Jacksonville Blues
3:23
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03
Big Boat Whistle
3:25
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04
The Evil Devil Blues
3:08
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05
New Vicksburg Blues
2:48
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06
Louise Louise Blues
2:59
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07
Snapping Cat
2:32
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08
So Lonely And Blue
2:31
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09
New Louise Louise Blues
2:31
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10
Peepin' Through The Keyhole
2:26
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11
Pimple Blues
2:53
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12
East St. Louis Blues
2:31
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13
Gimme Some Of That Yum Yum Yum
3:02
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14
Hoodoo Women
2:59
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15
Mama's Bad Luck Child
2:35
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16
Mean Baby Blues
2:58
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17
Beale Street Sheik
2:55
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18
What Is That Smells Like Gravy?
3:10
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19
Every Dog Must Have His Day
3:07
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20
Fare You Well
3:18
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21
Stavin' Chain
2:30
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22
County Jail Blues
2:33
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23
Gonna Ride 74
2:27
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 23   Total Length: 65:48

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They Say All Music Guide

Temple’s first recordings, beginning with the classic “Lead Pencil Blues” and three other songs (best of all, “Pig Boat Whistle”) from his May 14, 1935 sessions for Vocalion. “Lead Pencil Blues” was the first known use on record of the “walking bass” (Temple called it “running bass”) figure on the bottom string, which would become a blues commonplace in just a few years, popularized by Robert Johnson. Alas, these were also the most country-sounding records that Temple ever recorded–their lack of success convinced producers that Temple needed a more sophisticated sound, and all of his subsequent sessions, beginning 18 months later with “New Vicksburg Blues,” feature a prominent piano sharing the spotlight with the guitar, and the latter instrument played by Charlie McCoy. It’s all solid Chicago blues, “Louise Louise Blues,” “Snapping Cat,” and “So Lonely and So Blue” all being worth the price of the disc by themselves. Much of the later material, especially from the 1938 sessions backed by the Harlem Hamfats, is very smooth, commercial Chicago blues. Most of the sources are in better than decent condition, except for a very noisy “Beale Street Sheik,” which can be forgiven as a previously unissued Vocalion side. – Bruce Eder

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