|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Bringing In The Darlings

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (20 ratings)
Retail
Member
Bringing In The Darlings album cover
01
Why
2:47
$0.49
$0.99
02
Love Is Making Its Way Back Home
3:44
$0.49
$0.99
03
Darlin'
3:21
$0.49
$0.99
04
Make Me Down
4:15
$0.49
$0.99
05
See Me Through
4:22
$0.49
$0.99
06
Can't Go To Sleep (Without You)
3:17
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information

Total Tracks: 6   Total Length: 21:46

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 1 Member Review

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

Bringin in the Darlins

skiyaker

A sweet set of songs. Like each of Josh's other albums, this EP has its own sound and sensibility. Here the theme seems to be finding lost love and finding your darling (a word found in each of the songs)

They Say All Music Guide

Idaho-bred singer/songwriter Josh Ritter’s V2 Records debut follows in the footsteps of 2003′s Hello Starling only in instrumentation. While he retains his literate tongue and expressive voice, there is far less humor on Animal Years than on his previous two outings. Producer Brian Deck (Iron & Wine, Modest Mouse) keeps Animal Years intimate but transient, like a circus train crawling through a small town on a busy Saturday afternoon. Essentially built around two startlingly affecting diatribes on the war in Iraq, Ritter utilizes the voices of Peter and Paul, as well as Laurel & Hardy, to eke out some kind of explanation from both the Administration and the Creator. The first, the deceptively sweet-sounding “Girl in the War,” threatens “The angels fly around in there, but we can’t see them/I got a girl in the war, Paul I know that they can hear me yell/If they can’t find a way to help her they can go to Hell.” The second, “Thin Blue Flame,” is a nearly ten-minute rant that follows the Velvet Underground “Heroin” arc of tinder to spark to a full-on blaze in a way that hasn’t worked for anyone in a long time, but most certainly does here. The other cuts never reach the same heights, but standouts such as “Wolves,” with its sunrise gallop and “Whole of the Moon”-era Waterboys piano, and the languid “Monster Ballads” soar only inches beneath them. [A deluxe edition of Animal Years was reissued in 2011 and included a bonus disc featuring Ritter performing the entire album acoustic. It also includes four live B-sides, two videos, and new liner notes from Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Tom Ricks.] – James Christopher Monger

more »