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Unknown Pleasures [Collector's Edition]

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Unknown Pleasures [Collector's Edition] album cover
01
Disorder
3:29
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Day Of The Lords
4:48
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Candidate
3:08
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Insight
4:26
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New Dawn Fades
4:52
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She's Lost Control
3:57
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Shadowplay
3:54
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Wilderness
2:40
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Interzone
2:18
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I Remember Nothing
5:55
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Dead Souls
4:25
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The Only Mistake
4:12
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Insight
3:52
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Candidate
2:08
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Wilderness
2:32
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She's Lost Control
3:47
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Shadowplay
3:35
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Disorder
3:29
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Interzone
2:05
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Atrocity Exhibition
6:14
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Novelty
4:28
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Transmission
3:50
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 22   Total Length: 84:04

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Wondering Sound

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J. Edward Keyes

Editor-in-Chief

Joe Keyes writes about music.

03.01.10
Simply put: a classic — merciless, chilling and utterly perfect
1979 | Label: Rhino/Warner Bros.

The first song on Joy Division's justifiably classic (and utterly perfect) debut takes all the passion, fury, rage and nihilism of "Anarchy in the UK," and spikes it with a healthy fear of death. The band, which famously got its start after a sparsely attended — and, therefore, legendary — Buzzcocks/Sex Pistols double bill at the Manchester Free Trade Hall started out violent and thrashing and became more ruthless and effective by becoming… read more »

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Into darkness looking for light

RH3

"Unknown Pleasures" is Ian Curtis standing at the edge of the abyss and singing you the details of the world gone dark. Some songs are inward spirals. Some open strange hallways. Some songs are confessions of realising that we are as destructive and self-seeking as the demons who inhabit Joy Division's wilderness. The poisons of the time (1970's) and the deadend alley Ian saw in his life mingle in this recording. If these songs strike you as visions of your fears or a film of your suspitions, you are not alone. This recording seems to affect young adults and some teens. Older fans may not be as involved but we "Get" Joy DIvision as a real statement from the only band that went so close to the darkness and survived...all but Ian. The star system does not account for recordings like this which are almost outside ratings and stand are part of the listening necessary to appreciate life.

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so it begins...

JustSomeGuy

here you have Joy Division. Simple, raw and different from their contemporaries. Many say Closer was the more cohesive album, Unknown Pleasures delivers something else. A transition from the raw energy of punk to a more contained and restrained sound. I still listen to it today and always find something subtle i never noticed before.

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Not sure how I feel about it now...

robertb66

I used to listen to them when I was in high school and going through the dark period of my adolescence, but being in my forties now, I don't feel like feeling depressed. But still raw, strong, oddly melodic. and emotional material.

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A must

jjpm74

Anyone into any kind of alternative music should have this one in their collection. Features the collected unreleased works of Joy Division.

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Time

LivingxLarge

I killed this vinyl when I discovered Joy Division. The turntable is gone, the vinyl is stacked away in a closet, and I so much wanted to love this. Time is not this album's friend.

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2nd best

d0sitmatr

sorry to say, as I know some will disagree with me, but this is always going to be 2nd to Closer. although there are plenty of merits to this album in itself. the one thing this album will always be "more known" by most mainstream measure is due to the track "she's lost control" which is, without doubt, a great song. but not the full measure of this band by any means.

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Hate to say it,

timabouttown

but I'm gonna anyway. Ian Curtis sounds like a cross between Jim Morrison and the guy from Devo. I like Closer, and a couple of the singles, but c'mon, seriously...

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This one too

Allegory

Worth getting for the live tracks if you didn't already buy it at the store. There won't be a better band than this.

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2

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Whether you're happily married or told Cupid to shove it a long time ago, we can all agree on one thing: to quote the one-and-only Nazareth, "Love hurts/ Love scars/ Love wounds/ And mars." Or something. That's why we went ahead and compiled a list of 36 Songs To Soothe the Pain, from the bloodletting confessionals of Neko Case, Bright Eyes and Sunny Day Real Estate to the melancholic melodies of Sigur Rós, the Shangri-Las… more »

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It even looks like something classic, beyond its time or place of origin even as it was a clear product of both — one of Peter Saville’s earliest and best designs, a transcription of a signal showing a star going nova, on a black embossed sleeve. If that were all Unknown Pleasures was, it wouldn’t be discussed so much, but the ten songs inside, quite simply, are stone-cold landmarks, the whole album a monument to passion, energy, and cathartic despair. The quantum leap from the earliest thrashy singles to Unknown Pleasures can be heard through every note, with Martin Hannett’s deservedly famous production — emphasizing space in the most revelatory way since the dawn of dub — as much a hallmark as the music itself. Songs fade in behind furtive noises of motion and activity, glass breaks with the force and clarity of doom, minimal keyboard lines add to an air of looming disaster — something, somehow, seems to wait or lurk beyond the edge of hearing. But even though this is Hannett’s album as much as anyone’s, the songs and performances are the true key. Bernard Sumner redefined heavy metal sludge as chilling feedback fear and explosive energy, Peter Hook’s instantly recognizable bass work at once warm and forbidding, Stephen Morris’ drumming smacking through the speakers above all else. Ian Curtis synthesizes and purifies every last impulse, his voice shot through with the desire first and foremost to connect, only connect — as “Candidate” plaintively states, “I tried to get to you/You treat me like this.” Pick any song: the nervous death dance of “She’s Lost Control”; the harrowing call for release “New Dawn Fades,” all four members in perfect sync; the romance in hell of “Shadowplay”; “Insight” and its nervous drive toward some sort of apocalypse. All visceral, all emotional, all theatrical, all perfect — one of the best albums ever. [Rhino's 2007 reissue contains the album in remastered form on the first disc. A second disc features the band's set -- all 12 songs -- from its July 13, 1979, gig at Factory. Ten of the songs appeared on the 1998 Heart and Soul box set. Kevin Cummins' photos, Peter Saville's design, and Jon Savage's liner notes make up the booklet.] – Ned Raggett

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