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Made In China

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (114 ratings)
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Made In China album cover
01
New Waif
2:10
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02
What Do I Care
2:41
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03
Stay Awake
2:25
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04
On Video
2:37
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05
Hole In The Sky
2:55
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06
Oh
3:46
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07
My Pet Lion
2:50
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08
Going Blonde
1:21
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09
Rats In The Attic
3:16
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10
Digital Penetration
4:32
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11
A Doe And Two Fawns
4:02
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12
Send Money
4:47
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 37:22

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exile in chinaville

sixtwentysix

sounds very familiar... I really do like this album.

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Crude

Muse8

Crude, vulgar, and dull.

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Juliana is Back

Nickel-II

I have been a fan of Juliana Hatfield for a good 15 years, but have lost track of her recently. Found this on emusic and it is very impressive. Perhaps her strongest and most raw work to date, IMHO. Well worth the download and plan to listen to plenty. From a production standpoint, it reminds me a lot of Lenny Kravitz's early work where he wasn't over-produced and played all the instruments himself.

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Welcome Back!

Murphy917

Good to see Juliana Hatfield back Have missed her as well as the likes of Bob Mould,Lemonheads,Throwing Muses and other of my fave college year bands. Was a big fan of J.H. and the Blake Babies back in the early 90s and saw her play with the Lemonheads at the Cats Cradle in Chapel Hill. That is a great memory. First listen and a must download for me on shear memories alone. Look forward to further exploration of her new material.

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Same Olde Juliana, But Better

Pocket

Sick of the record industry, Juliana Hatfield did something that many veterans in her position do, start their own record label. On this, the debut album from her “Ye Olde Records” label, Juliana Hatfield returns to form. This record kicks with the melodic spunkiness that made records like Bed, Hey Babe, and Only Everything such treasures. Ms. Hatfield has stuck her neck out on this one: Releasing this record on her own label, producing her own record, playing many of the instruments herself including the drums on "Oh", and tackling many different and difficult subjects in her own way and on her own terms. Want to stand for individuality? Want to stand for guts? Want to stand for persistence? Want to stand up for an artist who has given a part of herself to you in her record (quite literally, it is her torso, after all, on the cover)? Buy this record... Oh yeah, and by the way, the songs are pretty damn good too. -GTR

They Say All Music Guide

Around the summer 2005 release of Made in China, Juliana Hatfield posted a gutsy, revealing letter on her website. In it she writes proudly of the album’s ragged feel, of her role as producer, of having released it through her own Ye Olde imprint. But there’s also a weird, rambling defensiveness to the note. “People can buy this record or not,” she writes. “I don’t care. Or at least I pretend not to care. But I do care.” She goes on to condemn artistic greed, industrial pollution, and the pressure on female artists to market themselves sexually. And then in her usual cynical fashion Hatfield winks at the whole notion, putting a photo of herself in a bathtub into the album’s booklet. Made in China is as honest and unadorned as that letter. It unmasks her empty feelings on love (the slithery, dispassionate breakup song “On Video”) and hate for a poisoned world (“Rats in the Attic,” which musically is this record’s closest amalgam to her past work), and in its strikingly direct recording quality it reacts to 2004′s In Exile Deo, which despite being her strongest album in a long time was a little over-produced. For all these things China is terrifically rewarding. It’s raw — like a home-recording genius blistering the dry wall with four-track recordings, the solo confessionals “A Doe and Two Fawns” and “Send Money” shatter silence with twining tones and sly lyrics. (“If you want to pray for me, tell God to send me some money,” goes the latter.) It bashes — “What Do I Care” features the Boston band Unbusted and mulls over Hatfield’s alternative rock darling past. And she considers whether any of it mattered, whether she was exploited, and whether or not she even cares in retrospect. She’s accepting of those days, but rightly pissed that she’ll be compared to them forever. In Exile Deo was her arrival as a mature, seen-it-all-and-still-wondering songwriter. But China is the truly unguarded version of that idea in both sound and song. Opener “New Waif” establishes that. As the music builds and bristles, Hatfield sings of love and missed chances, and the filter on her voice makes a total nonfactor of that girlish quality everybody used to fawn over so much. She’s the new version of herself, the now version, and what does she care if you don’t like it? But you will. – Johnny Loftus

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