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Meet Me In The City

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (27 ratings)
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Meet Me In The City album cover
01
Meet Me In The City
3:12
$0.49
$0.99
02
Done Got Old
5:00
$0.49
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03
Baby Please Don't Leave Me
5:22
$0.49
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04
Lonesome Road
4:57
$0.49
$0.99
05
Junior's Place
6:00
$0.49
$0.99
06
I Feel Alright
5:50
$0.49
$0.99
07
All Night Long
5:55
$0.49
$0.99
08
Nobody But You
4:57
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information

Total Tracks: 8   Total Length: 41:13

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Varied Quality, full ambience

kenshima

Despite the tracks 2-4 being of a pretty mediocore sound quality they do a fine job of capturing the grungy feel of Junior's music in a live setting. But beware, if you can't stand tape cycling or background talk, pass on those tracks and just go straight to "Junior's Place" and after.

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Different Strokes For Different Folks...

hungry4ever

I LOVE the first four songs on this album. They are raw, reverb soaked, haunting recordings. They are not slick, glossy, overproduced or particularly clear. But the mood they create is one of a kind. I agree, take a listen before buying. But for me ( and most of my friends) the first four are the BEST!

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Too bad...

AntEater

I love Junior Kimbrough's music and the songs on this album are good *BUT* on the first four tracks the sound quality is horrid. By that I mean awful to the point where it is distracting from being able to enjoy these songs at all. Listen to the previews closely to see if it is something you can deal with before downloading. It's really too bad because this could be a truly great album otherwise.

eMusic Features

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Label Profile: Fat Possum Records

By Marc Hogan, Lead News Writer

File Under: From raw, gutbucket blues to soul, rock and pop with a similar unspoiled spirit Flagship Acts: R.L. Burnside, Junior Kimbrough, Solomon Burke, the Black Keys, Andrew Bird, Band of Horses, Dinosaur Jr., Wavves, the Walkmen, Smith Westerns, Yuck, Tennis Based In: Oxford, Mississippi Like the Delta bluesmen whose records he started Fat Possum to release, Matthew Johnson is part of a dying breed. Rock owes much of its early legacy to eccentric, mostly European-descended label owners… more »

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Six Degrees of Junior Kimbrough’s All Night Long

By John Morthland, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

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Six Degrees of Junior Kimbrough’s All Night Long

By John Morthland, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

At its best, Meet Me in the City seems like a postmortem rarities tribute to a blues great who never got his proper due. At its worst, the record is cashing in on a Kimbrough recording that just happens to be lying around. The first four songs, home recordings from 1992, are so horribly noisy and hazy sounding that it’s difficult to hear Kimbrough’s down-home modern offbeat Delta blues and his rough, weathered vocals. Still, the tracks present an intimate and relaxed look at the elder bluesman — they are chilling, ghost-like, and off-the-cuff. The last four songs, from 1996 and 1993, respectively, are of better sonic quality, without distracting echo and distorted microphones. The riffs and beat of “Junior’s Place” are directly descended from the tried “Good Morning Little Schoolgirl.” It’s too bad that the album didn’t contain more selections from the 1993 Sunflower Blues Festival: here, Kimbrough incorporates the boogie stomp of John Lee Hooker into the irregular frequency of his own romp, and as a result, the record closes on an upbeat and fresh note. Since Kimbrough is on the level next to blues pioneers Son House and Tommy Johnson, it’s hard to dismiss the importance of any record blessed with his mastery. Still, with several studio albums to choose from (the first coming in 1992), it’s not like the music on Meet Me in the City is as rare as the music on House’s Delta Blues, which is the only lasting aural document from his early and most illustrative days. The absence of any liner notes, captivating photos, or essays makes the record lean toward the cash-in-on-death direction. What all this means is that Meet Me in the City is exclusively for those already in love with Kimbrough’s dissonant blues guitar style. – Bob Gendron

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