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Most Things Haven't Worked Out

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (73 ratings)
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Most Things Haven't Worked Out album cover
01
Lonesome Road
3:37
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02
I'm In Love
8:38
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03
Everywhere I Go
4:49
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04
Burn In Hell
7:44
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05
Most Things Haven't Worked Out
6:07
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06
Leave Her Alone
7:26
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07
I Love Ya Baby
6:52
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08
I'm Leaving You Baby
3:27
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 8   Total Length: 48:40

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Crunchy Blues, Sultry Lyrics

kenshima

The sound of Junior's band is well captured on this album. Some tracks were recorded at Junior's Place and retain a nice smokey feel. Others done in studio still retain the feel of a live set minus the clinking glasses and cat calls.

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The Real Deal

NoName137

Junior Kimbrough knew how to get a groove on and this album captures that to the T. Kimbrough's guitar licks skate over the bare knuckled rhythm section and the result is pure bliss. If you haven't heard JK, go get yourself some.

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Great!

AntEater

I'd never even heard of Junior Kimbrough before discovering this album through eMusic. I was blown away with how good this album is. Raw, simple blues at its best. As a side note, if you like the Black Keys you'll most likely like Junior Kimbrough's music. You can hear the direct influence he must have had on them.

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The Best Ever Title For A Blues Album

prsce96

Junior Kimbrough's droning hill country style has come into vogue over the past few years with R.L. Burnside, T-Model Ford and other Fat Possum artists. Even Buddy Guy used the style on "Sweet Tea" to great results. This is a dark, fantastic example of the style. Even cuts like, "I'm In Love" are haunting. Fans of this style of blues won't be disappointed, and this is a good introduction to anyone unfamiliar with the style.

eMusic Features

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Label Profile: Fat Possum Records

By Marc Hogan, Lead News Writer

File Under: From raw, gutbucket blues to soul, rock and pop with a similar unspoiled spirit Flagship Acts: R.L. Burnside, Junior Kimbrough, Solomon Burke, the Black Keys, Andrew Bird, Band of Horses, Dinosaur Jr., Wavves, the Walkmen, Smith Westerns, Yuck, Tennis Based In: Oxford, Mississippi Like the Delta bluesmen whose records he started Fat Possum to release, Matthew Johnson is part of a dying breed. Rock owes much of its early legacy to eccentric, mostly European-descended label owners… more »

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Six Degrees of Junior Kimbrough’s All Night Long

By John Morthland, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

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Six Degrees of Junior Kimbrough’s All Night Long

By John Morthland, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

While this album lacks the revelatory impact of Kimbrough’s debut All Night Long, or a hair-raising number like that release’s “You Better Run,” and it is akin to his debut in both its packaging and its production values. With three of the tracks recorded directly from Junior Kimbrough’s Juke Joint, the sound here is absolutely raw; aside from the ugly drum tone in “Everywhere I Go,” it’s a perfect evocation of live performance. Indeed, half the fascination in Kimbrough’s works are the strange harmonics, “off” notes, and just sheer noise that gives a murky depth to his repetitive looping around a song’s tonic note. Even the lyrics are often buried beneath layers of blues grunge, but it hardly matters — the whole album qualifies as a liminal, half-waking Mississippi dream. Highlights include the hypnotic “I’m in Love,” and the stomping “Burn in Hell,” which Kimbrough introduces by ribbing a bandmate: “If I die before you, I go before you, I’m gonna be there to open the door — come on in, brother!” With less than a year left to live, Kimbrough could still laugh at eternity. – Paul Collins

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