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Kate & Anna McGarrigle

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (62 ratings)
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Kate & Anna McGarrigle album cover
01
Kiss And Say Goodbye
2:51
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02
My Town
3:00
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03
Blues In D
2:43
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04
Heart Like A Wheel
3:12
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05
Foolish You
3:04
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06
Talk To Me Of Mendocino
3:11
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07
Complainte Pour Ste Catherine
2:52
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08
Tell My Sister
3:41
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09
Swimming Song
2:30
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10
Jigsaw Puzzle Of Life
2:33
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11
Go Leave
3:23
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12
Travellin' On For Jesus
2:43
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 35:43

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Forever

belanger

I first heard this album when working at a college radio station when it came out. I fell in love with it and while many albums have come and gone, this one keeps sounding great. Kate and Anna create music you can't really label. Like the most special albums, it creates its own unique space. A total original. I would put side one up against any other ever made--Kiss and Say Goodbye, Blues, their Heart LIke a Wheel, the wonderful Foolish You, and then, perhaps the most beautiful song written in the last 40 years, Mendocino. Kate, your soul lives on. Anna, best always

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Quietly Ornery

kathymiller

I've owned this on vinyl, cassette, CD, and now mp3. The McGarrigle Sisters' voices meld together in beautiful harmony, with enough wacky instrumental backing to keep you a little bit off center. Their lyrics were witty, sophisticated, memorable. How perfect is "I want to kiss you until my mouth gets numb"? I recently made a compilation for my friend's three year old son with "Swimming Song" on it. Wanted to teach him to take chances and find joy. "Complainte Pour Ste. Catherine" sung in exquisite Quebecois, walking the tacky red light district with smoked meat shops and sex toys, hiding a joke about Montreal's notorious frozen winters. Their "Heart Like a Wheel" erases Linda Ronstadt's version permanently. A perfect collection of songs from two sisters who never dumbed-down, pandered, went sacharine or cloying. Goodbye, Kate. My condolences Anna to you and the family.

user avatar

Naked music

gbeast_1

This recording from 1975 is timeless. I owned this album for a couple of years before I fully appreciated it. It is naked music, not in the sense that any body parts are exposed, other than the heart, but naked because it is simple, honest music unadorned with the trappings of of the music production industry. It is sweet, personal, and charming, but well crafted by two who love the music.

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RIP Kate.

smw380

thanks for all the good music

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They Say All Music Guide

Debut albums simply aren’t supposed to be as accomplished and beautifully crafted as Kate & Anna McGarrigle’s first record, which is as lovely and superbly realized as folk-rock gets. While producers Joe Boyd and Greg Prestopino assembled an all-star crew to back up the McGarrigle sisters (including Lowell George, Tony Levin, Steve Gadd, and Bobby Keys), nothing steals the spotlight away from Kate and Anna, both of whom sing with a pure clarity that’s never so pretty it fails to reflect the real world, harmonize with an uncanny grace, and write songs that are clever, witty, wise, and often deeply moving. Lots of folkies have written movingly about the troubling ties of home (as in “My Town” and “Talk to Me of Mendocino”), a good number have sung about the ache of a broken heart (like in “Heart Like a Wheel,” famously covered by Linda Ronstadt), some can communicate bitter resignation or sly, sarcastic wit (“Go Leave” and “Jigsaw Puzzle of Life”), and no more than a few can express the joys of grown-up eros (“Kiss and Say Goodbye”). Kate & Anna McGarrigle is a record that manages to make all these emotions ring true, and never with one canceling out another. Quite simply a nearly perfect record, and if you’re not a fan, repeated listenings to this album might make you one. – Mark Deming

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