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Fallen Angel

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Fallen Angel album cover
01
Inner City Blues
3:31  
02
Fallen
3:46  
03
Never Never
3:34  
04
(Angel on Sunset) Bumpin` on Sunset
5:40  
05
Stardust
0:55  
06
Misty
4:32  
07
I Remember Bill
3:08  
08
Pieta
5:53  
09
Thus Spoke Z
4:49  
10
Stella by Starlight
4:32  
11
Monk's Corner
6:26  
12
Westerly Wind
2:04  
13
The Moors
2:54  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 51:44

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eMusic Features

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The Postmodern Blues of Joe Louis Walker

By John Morthland, Contributor

Can there be any doubt that Joe Louis Walker has finally arrived? Between a Rock and the Blues, released in the fall of 2009, has earned him five Blues Music Awards nominations, more than any other artist. After a quarter-century on the national circuit, it's about time. Walker is a postmodern bluesman firmly rooted in tradition. He's absorbed postwar electric guitarists, ranging from the three Kings to the Texas-to-California school led by T-Bone Walker; he also… more »

They Say All Music Guide

On Fallen Angel, Larry Coryell teams up with arranger Don Sebesky to produce a wide-ranging album full of sampled sounds and programmed tracks in an attempt to mix the old CTI sound of the ’70s with the production techniques and rhythms of the ’90s. “Inner City Blues” kicks things off with great promise, as Coryell jams over a pre-programmed rhythm track with background vocalists. On “(Angel on Sunset) Bumpin’ on Sunset,” he improvises along with a sampled Wes Montgomery, then turns Erroll Garner’s classic “Misty” into a mid-tempo reggae jaunt through which he and pianist Mulgrew Miller travel lightly. The CTI connection is brought to the forefront with a remake of Deodato’s “2001″ hit called “Thus Spoke Z,” on which the famous theme is implied but never stated. Other highlights include a funky, angular tribute called “Monk’s Corner,” Sebesky’s attractive “I Remember Bill” and the solo “Westerly Wind.” There are also two pleasant smooth jazz vocal pieces at the front of the album, the beautiful ballad, “Fallen,” a duet between vocalists Klyde Jones and Jeanie Bryson, and the funky made-for-radio “Never Never,” featuring saxophonist Richard Elliot and a vocal from Ms. Jones.
Fallen Angel was obviously an attempt to find Larry Coryell a place on the smooth jazz playlist, a task it didn’t really accomplish. While it is not likely to appease those who bemoan the guitarist’s failure to live up to his initial promise, it can be enjoyed if taken on its own terms. – Jim Newsom

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