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Beasts Of Seasons

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01
Shadows On Parade
7:31
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02
Come By Storm
4:16
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03
Spirited
3:15
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04
Postures Bent
3:41
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05
Funeral Song
3:51
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06
Where Have All Your Good Words Gone
3:39
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07
Sleeper
4:40
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08
Sweet Deception
4:28
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09
Glory
4:01
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 9   Total Length: 39:22

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eMusic Features

1

Six Degrees of Janis Joplin’s Pearl

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

1

Six Degrees of Janis Joplin’s Pearl

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

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By J. Edward Keyes, Editor-in-Chief

The first HUGE new release day of 2012, so strap in and get ready for a pretty comprehensive rundown! Dave Sumner's got your jazz picks, and I've got the rest. Here we go! Cloud Nothings, Attack on Memory: ALBUM OF THE DAY. Dylan Baldi grows up in a nanosecond, making a snarling rock record that hurtles forward with the speed and fury of a meteor. The sonic touchstones here are '90s emo greats like Jawbreaker, the… more »

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A Field Report from the New Country

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

Whither country music - or will it wither? Most of the c&w on strut at the recent CMA awards had more to do with 80's power-rock and 00's teen-pop than the morning farm report. In recent years, an alt-country movement in such Willy-billy suburbs as Brooklyn's Williamsburg has waved a country flag, along with a taste for trucker's caps and Pabst Blue Ribbon. This isn't a sudden outcropping on the range; ever since Gram Parsons… more »

They Say All Music Guide

There are a lot of superficial similarities between Laura Gibson and Laura Veirs — besides sharing a given name, the pair are both artful and poetic singer/songwriters rooted in the Portland, OR, scene, both released albums in 2009 that were overseen by producer/drummer Tucker Martine, and both are NPR darlings. That’s pretty much where the comparisons end, though. While Veirs’ contemporaneous recording, July Flame, is a scaled-down acoustic-based affair, Beasts of Seasons is the sonic equivalent of tumbleweeds blowing through a ghost town — or more accurately, across a cemetery; these meditations on mortality were actually written by Gibson in a room that overlooked a graveyard. Between its spare production approach, Gibson’s agreeably dusty delivery, and the gloomy subject matter, Beasts of Seasons makes even the relatively low-key July Flame seem like a nonstop dance party. Gibson leaves no uncertainties hovering in the air about her thematic intentions here, crooning “If these bare walls could sing, they would sing us a funeral song” on the appropriately titled “Funeral Song,” and filling many of the tunes with sharply observed, creatively deployed observations about humanity’s losing battle against eternity. She brings just as much concision and power to the songs by way of her singing; Gibson’s voice is a warm, husky burr, as she picks up each word and positions it just right before popping it out in a puff of sweet smoke. The way she sings “heavy in my chest” on “Sleeper,” for instance, could serve as a model for the hidden punctuation vital to poetic phrasing. At one point, the sessions for Beasts of Seasons were apparently interrupted by a street parade outside, which Martine captured and dropped into a couple of carefully chosen spots, like the end of “Sweet Deception,” where the words “learn to be alone” fade into the sounds of a frolicking group of party-goers, bringing to mind a New Orleans funeral procession that mixes sadness and celebration in equal amounts. – James Allen

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