|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Celebration Day

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (36 ratings)
Retail
Member
Celebration Day album cover
01
Good Times Bad Times (Live: O2 Arena, London - December 10, 2007)
3:11
$0.79
$1.29
02
Ramble On (Live: O2 Arena, London - December 10, 2007)
5:44
$0.79
$1.29
03
Black Dog (Live: O2 Arena, London - December 10, 2007)
5:53
$0.79
$1.29
04
In My Time Of Dying (Live: O2 Arena, London - December 10, 2007)
11:10
 
05
For Your Life (Live: O2 Arena, London - December 10, 2007)
6:40
$0.79
$1.29
06
Trampled Under Foot (Live: O2 Arena, London - December 10, 2007)
6:19
$0.79
$1.29
07
Nobody's Fault But Mine (Live: O2 Arena, London - December 10, 2007)
6:43
$0.79
$1.29
08
No Quarter (Live: O2 Arena, London - December 10, 2007)
9:21
$0.79
$1.29
09
Since I've Been Loving You (Live: O2 Arena, London - December 10, 2007)
7:52
$0.79
$1.29
10
Dazed And Confused (Live: O2 Arena, London - December 10, 2007)
11:44
 
11
Stairway To Heaven (Live: O2 Arena, London - December 10, 2007)
8:49
$0.79
$1.29
12
The Song Remains The Same (Live: O2 Arena, London - December 10, 2007)
5:46
$0.79
$1.29
13
Misty Mountain Hop (Live: O2 Arena, London - December 10, 2007)
5:08
$0.79
$1.29
14
Kashmir (Live: O2 Arena, London - December 10, 2007)
9:06
$0.79
$1.29
15
Whole Lotta Love (Live: O2 Arena, London - December 10, 2007)
7:26
$0.79
$1.29
16
Rock And Roll (Live: O2 Arena, London - December 10, 2007)
4:34
$0.79
$1.29
Album Information

Total Tracks: 16   Total Length: 115:26

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 6 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

Celebration Cancelled

bullphrogg

No where on the site did this say this was a live album. Listening to recordings of Zeppelin live is like reading a brochure about an art gallery. It's not the same as being at the location. Sorry, but I never liked Zeppelin live. This was a wasted purchase for me.

user avatar

Single Songs

robynhode

Great album and we can download individual songs too. Thanks eMusic!

user avatar

Something To Celebrate!

a_boy_alone

Although I have always loved Led Zeppelin's music, I have often been disappointed with their live recordings. The songs were too experimental and unfocused, or Plant was singing out of tune, or Page's playing was sloppy, and they just didn't thrill me like the studio versions. Well, that has changed with Celebration Day. These songs are all very well played and have the original thrill. It's as if they decided to play the songs just as they are on the albums, and it really works well. Plant's voice is spot-on and still strong; Page is much tighter in his rhythms, and even his solos sound very similar to the album solos. Jones rocks on both bass and keys, and Bonham plays with all the energy and force as the songs required. The set selection is a great panorama spanning their career, and for me, it is the first time hearing a live version of "Good Times, Bad Times." This is a great album for the band to present after all of these years.

user avatar

Live recordings suck

BoobyLover

Sorry, but I am sure I am alone, I absolutely hate live concert recordings.

user avatar

celabration day

EMUSIC-02BEBFC8

great last remembrance of the greatest band ever

user avatar

Celebration Day

DustRadio

60 year olds who still know how to rock better than anyone out today. This set could have come straight from 1977, only Page is actually playing better than in his heyday. Plant sounds great, John Paul Jones carries a bass rhythem better than any in rock and roll and Jason Bonham channels the spirit of his father John in a way that is uncanny. Includes the only performance by Zeppelin ever of "For Your Life", arguably the best song from Presence. Get it. You won't be disappointed.

Recommended Albums

eMusic Features

0

Six Degrees of Heart’s Little Queen

By Chuck Eddy, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Heart’s Little Queen

By Chuck Eddy, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Led Zeppelin, III

By Dan Epstein, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Led Zeppelin, III

By Dan Epstein, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Led Zeppelin: A Critical Discography

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

Listening to them 30 years on, the amazing thing about Led Zeppelin is how truly strange their recorded work is. Lead guitarist Jimmy Page might have been the mastermind, but each personality squared the circle: or, as they put it on the album that gave us "Stairway", Z O S O (their substitute rune-ic initials). Their music is everywhere still, resonating from all their eras, and their tale — in its alchemical excess and lurid… more »

0

Led Zeppelin: A Critical Discography

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

Listening to them 30 years on, the amazing thing about Led Zeppelin is how truly strange their recorded work is. Lead guitarist Jimmy Page might have been the mastermind, but each personality squared the circle: or, as they put it on the album that gave us "Stairway", Z O S O (their substitute rune-ic initials). Their music is everywhere still, resonating from all their eras, and their tale — in its alchemical excess and lurid… more »

1

A Tale of Two Cults: the Flamin’ Groovies and Spirit

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

Two old faves recently surfaced on eMusic, and I must say it's been a pleasure to renew their acquaintance. Both bands grew up in the California '60s, polar opposites from southern El and northern Es, and were as much reaction to their hometowns as representative. Each had a cultish lifeline that has served to burnish their reputation since an early seventies heyday, and both made music of a heightened musical ideal and purity. Spirit's first album… more »

1

An Introduction to the Yardbirds

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

There were many British bands that swiveled rock's glorious adolescence, but for my nascent psychedelia and guitar drool, the Yardbirds have long held the most resonance. The wonder of first hearing the extended rave-up of "I'm A Man;" the Gregorian chants of "Still I'm Sad;" the eastern swami of "Over Under Sideways Down;" the clarion clang of the harpsichord in "For Your Love" forever changed for me how I would hear rock music. I sometimes think… more »