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Houses Of The Holy

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Houses Of The Holy album cover
01
The Song Remains The Same
5:30
 
02
The Rain Song
7:39
 
03
Over The Hills And Far Away
4:49
 
04
The Crunge
3:15
 
05
Dancing Days
3:42
 
06
D'yer Mak'er
4:22
 
07
No Quarter
7:00
 
08
The Ocean
4:31
 
Album Information
ALBUM ONLY // EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 8   Total Length: 40:48

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Wondering Sound

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Lenny Kaye

Contributor

As musician, writer, and producer, Lenny Kaye is intimately involved with the creative impulse. He has been a guitarist for poet-rocker Patti Smith since her ba...more »

04.14.10
A global reach; an expansion of the band's music rather than contraction
1973 | Label: Atlantic Records

Last night, while writing this piece, I went out for a cold Yuengling in my town, and there, as if bidden, “The Ocean” came on the jukebox. This is not unusual. Any random journey with the radio on is likely to produce a Zeppelin song being played somewhere. But listening to it in a crowded bar on a Saturday night, visualizing Robert Plant looking out “singing to an ocean, I can hear the oceans roar,”… read more »

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Houses of the Holy

dejapete

This is my favorite Led Zeppelin album to date. To me, it's a departure from their previous albums, exploring new territory. Robert Plant's vocals seem not as strong. I don't mean that in a bad way. I read a interview where he said he didn't know how long he'd be with band because it was wrecking his voice.

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Great All Round Album

eaa001

Houses of the Holy includes 8 strong tracks. Robert Plant's voice did not seem as strong as on other Zeppelin albums, the songs are so strong it doesn't matter.

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Beauty & Power

xj32

Probably Zeps most diverse release.

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Ironic...

paperphoenix

Does no one else think it's funny that the song "Houses of the Holy" is not on the album of the same name?

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WOW LED ZEP ON E MUSIC I'LL BUY IT !

Alpsman

OH NO, SILLY ME OF COURSE I WON'T BECAUSE THIS IS A CLASSIC BRITISH ROCK BAND AND I LIVE IN BRITAIN SO OF COURSE I CAN'T BUY IT. WHY OH WHO OH WHY OH WHY DO I SUBSCRIBE. I KNOW I'LL GO AND DOWNLOAD SOME THIRD RATE HAIR METAL BAND DOING A CR*P COPY OF A ZEP TRACK INSTEAD BECAUSE I BET THEY LET ME DOWNLOAD THAT!!!!!!!!!!!!

user avatar

forget the viagra, methusala

thegrandwazoo

back in the dancing dinosaur days, "houses" was the official electric mating call--this may be more than some of the young ones want to know--visions of watching many a tail feather tickle this caveman's heavy metal grey matter, and thank god the song remains the same--forget the viagra, methusala--conjure up a rain song--it's dy'er ma'ker for dancing days again--offer no quarter on your way over the hills and far away to the ocean

user avatar

The BEST for the Zep

DC10

All 8 tracks are iconic, legendary songs that cover wide stylistic ground, yet still hang together as the perfect album.

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the second best from the best

woodsport

all these years, all this music - classic rock, punk rock, indie rock - led zep is still the best. this is a close second to III in my opinion

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They Say All Music Guide

Houses of the Holy follows the same basic pattern as Led Zeppelin IV, but the approach is looser and more relaxed. Jimmy Page’s riffs rely on ringing, folky hooks as much as they do on thundering blues-rock, giving the album a lighter, more open atmosphere. While the pseudo-reggae of “D’Yer Mak’er” and the affectionate James Brown send-up “The Crunge” suggest that the band was searching for material, they actually contribute to the musical diversity of the album. “The Rain Song” is one of Zep’s finest moments, featuring a soaring string arrangement and a gentle, aching melody. “The Ocean” is just as good, starting with a heavy, funky guitar groove before slamming into an a cappella section and ending with a swinging, doo wop-flavored rave-up. With the exception of the rampaging opening number, “The Song Remains the Same,” the rest of Houses of the Holy is fairly straightforward, ranging from the foreboding “No Quarter” and the strutting hard rock of “Dancing Days” to the epic folk/metal fusion “Over the Hills and Far Away.” Throughout the record, the band’s playing is excellent, making the eclecticism of Page and Robert Plant’s songwriting sound coherent and natural. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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