|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

The Future

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (2 ratings)
Retail
Member
The Future album cover
01
The Future
6:41
$0.69
$0.99
02
Waiting for the Miracle
7:42
$0.69
$0.99
03
Be for Real
4:29
$0.49
$0.99
04
Closing Time
5:58
$0.49
$0.99
05
Anthem
6:06
$0.69
$0.99
06
Democracy
7:12
$0.69
$0.99
07
Light as the Breeze
7:14
$0.49
$0.99
08
Always
8:02
$0.49
$0.99
09
Tacoma Trailer
5:57
$0.69
$0.99
Album Information

Total Tracks: 9   Total Length: 59:21

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

eMusic Features

0

Who Is…King Dude

By Jon Wiederhorn, Contributor

Once the frontman for hardcore and black metal bands Teen Cthulhu and Book of Black Earth, TJ Cowgill started writing raw, stripped-down folk songs under the name King Dude (borrowed from metal hero King Diamond) in 2005. The project started just for kicks one drunken night. Even his stage name came on a whim. "My roommate and I were bored, so I picked up an acoustic guitar and started writing these songs as a joke,… more »

4

Comeback Kids: The 10 Best Musical Resurrections

By Arye Dworken, Contributor

Remember that band you loved that broke up? Well, next year, they're playing Coachella. We live in an age when band reunions are bordering on passé, which can obscure the fact that a well-executed comeback is often difficult to come by. Take Limp Bizkit. That once incredibly popular band released an album this year that you probably had had no idea existed. Or on a somewhat more credible note, Duran Duran reunited and recruited famed… more »

0

May Your Song Always Be Sung

By Douglas Wolk, Contributor

"Singer/songwriter" has gradually come to be applied to nearly everyone who both writes and performs songs, especially if they happen to play guitar and are billed under their own names rather than as members of a band. But it used to have a particular meaning, in some cases, that was a little more specific: a singer who performed self-written songs that were meant for other people to sing, too. That's a tradition that's not nearly… more »

1

New This Week: Lana Del Rey, Leonard Cohen & More

By J. Edward Keyes, Editor-in-Chief

Hey, have you guys heard anything about this Lana Del Rey person? I feel like no one's talking about her. What I wouldn't give to find out any information on her. Seems real mysterious. Well, whoever she is, we have her record and a whole lot of others today. Let's go! Leonard Cohen, Old Ideas: Seriously, I think we all just need to take a pause and revel in the fact that there is a new… more »

0

Six Degrees of Cat Stevens’ Tea for the Tillerman

By Andy Beta, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

eMusic Selects: Family Band

By Jayson Greene, Managing Editor

[eMusic Selects is a program designed by eMusic to give exposure to unsigned or undersigned bands. This month's selections are Strand of Oaks and Family Band] The arresting, winter-bitten folk songs of Family Band feel like dispatches from some older, crueler place and time: a typhoid-wracked 18th-century town, perhaps, or a medieval village gripped by witch trials. In reality, it is the project of two latter-day Brooklyn expats — Kim Krans, a visual artist, and her… more »

0

Six Degrees of The Postal Service’s Give Up

By Jon Dolan, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Grace

By Karen Schoemer, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Icon: Leonard Cohen

By Sam Adams, Contributor

The mantle of poet is too often bestowed on any musician with a flair for the polysyllabic, but in Leonard Cohen's case, it's merely a statement of fact. Before he made his debut on record in 1967, Cohen published several volumes of poetry and a brace of novels, which helps explain the density and rich detail of even his earliest songs. Although he's widened his range in recent years, Cohen's voice has always been a… more »