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The Essential Little Richard

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (94 ratings)

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The Essential Little Richard album cover
01
Tutti Frutti
2:26  
02
Long Tall Sally
2:10  
03
Rip It Up
2:23  
04
Jenny Jenny
2:02  
05
Good Golly, Miss Molly
2:08  
06
Ready Teddy
2:08  
07
Slippin' And Slidin'
2:41  
08
The Girl Can't Help It
2:32  
09
I Got It
2:19  
10
Heeby-Jeebies
2:13  
11
Lucille
2:23  
12
Keep-A-Knockin'
2:18  
13
Miss Ann
2:18  
14
Ooh! My Soul
2:06  
15
True Fine Mama
2:43  
16
Directly From My Heart
2:20  
17
Hey Hey Hey Hey
2:05  
18
Send Me Some Lovin'
2:20  
19
Baby Face
2:15  
20
By The Light Of The Silvery Moon
2:05  
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 20   Total Length: 45:55

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Wondering Sound

Review 0

Lenny Kaye

Contributor

As musician, writer, and producer, Lenny Kaye is intimately involved with the creative impulse. He has been a guitarist for poet-rocker Patti Smith since her ba...more »

04.22.11
Little Richard, The Essential Little Richard
2000 | Label: Fantasy / Specialty

"Tutti Frutti" was the first rock & roll song I ever heard, knee-high to the big console radio in my living room, and it induced the kind of hysterical laughter reserved for true manifestations of the Holy Spirit. But then Little Richard has always spoken in tongues as he moved between the worlds of the sacred and profane. His gospel shout gives a preacher's fervor to these slabs of R&B, and yet, in the very… read more »

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hmmm?

Josquin

I downloaded a track off of this about 2 years ago and when I came back to download it now says it isn't available?? hmm?

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SG from SC

EMUSIC-01D936C1

This is a great album and I'm happy to have it as my first little Richard disc. I rate it a 5.

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have a ball tonight

ae_4355

would there be a paul mccartney without little richard? Several 2 minute bursts of genius proto rock.

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Title says it all

ThatEngishGuy

See that word "Essential" in the title? That means it's esential to your wellbeing that you download this album. I don't care if you're on your deathbed, this music will make you boooooooooogie.

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Good Golly, Good Stuff

coopco95843

Downloaded Good Golly Miss Molly and Tutti Fruitti. Good stuff.

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A Womp Bomp

RadioRandy

A Loo Bomp Wooooooooooooooooooooooooo! Rock and Roll doesn't get any more elemental, sweatier, crazier, rockier, rollier, bumpier and grindier than Richard Penniman. Little Richard was caught between the sacred and the profane (just like piano pumper Jerry Lee Lewis), and Little Richard's gospel-influenced, boogie-woogied, straight up rock and roll piano, wild vocals and outrageous persona fueled a land of a million dances. The tracks on 'Essential' hit you like a drunken football tackle and don't let up until oh, say around track 14. Get 'em all, but ESPECIALLY those first 14 tracks. You really won't need any other Little Richard in your collection. Except maybe "Bama Lama Bama Loo." Woooooooooooooo!

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They Say All Music Guide

Little Richard was not only one of the first great stars of rock & roll, he was one of the young music’s first great cultural affronts, and while he was selling records hand over first in 1955 and 1956, he seemed strange to squares in a way Chuck Berry or Fats Domino couldn’t quite match, with his beyond-crazed performing style and ambiguous fashion sense. For Richard’s second LP, 1957′s simply titled Little Richard, Specialty Records’ A&R men got the clever idea that by covering a few old standards, the Georgia Peach might win over some parents who had been put off by his earlier work. The flaw in this thinking was that by the time Richard got through with “Baby Face” and “By the Light of the Silvery Moon,” they sounded like Little Richard tunes — which is to say the vocals howled, the piano rang out like church bells on speed, and his band swung hard behind it all. Little Richard was every bit as rockin’ as his first album, if not more so; “Keep A’Knockin’,” “Lucille,” “Good Golly Miss Molly,” and “The Girl Can’t Help It” were hits for the right reason, “All Around the World” is still a clarion call for the power of the music (and most adults were probably not comforted by the song’s proclamation that young fans of the big beat “never have time for romance/ they only wanna dance”), “Send Me Some Lovin’” slows down the tempo while still laying out the good groove, “Ooh! My Soul” is deliciously lascivious, and there isn’t a single throwaway among the 12 tunes on deck. Richard’s band (sadly unidentified by name) are in glorious form as well, and Cosimo Matassa (who recorded the bulk of these songs at his tiny J&M Studios in New Orleans) makes these sessions sound as raucous as they deserved. Little Richard was too crazed to win over many suspicious parents in 1957, but thankfully it wails loud enough that no one was likely to hear them complain, and it still gets the party started 50 years on. – Mark Deming

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