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Blues, Ballads And Jumpin' Jazz Volume 2

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (6 ratings)

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Blues, Ballads And Jumpin' Jazz Volume 2 album cover
01
Lester Leaps In
3:32  
02
Blue And All Alone
5:54  
03
On The Sunny Side Of The Street
3:30  
04
C-Jam Blues
4:09  
05
New Orleans Blues
6:08  
06
Careless Love
3:57  
07
Stormy Weather (Take 1)
4:54  
08
Stormy Weather (Take 2)
4:24  
09
I Ain't Gonna Give Nobody None O' This Jelly Roll
3:17  
10
Birth Of The Blues
3:00  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 42:45

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You think you know something about blues....

gulfseas

And do not have this one?...where you been?

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blues, ballads &jumpin' jazz

kostie

This album is an absolute gem. This is Lonnie Johnson at his best ably accompanied by Elmer Snowdon, truly a find in a million. download & play over & over and never tire, wonderful blues/jazz

user avatar

Good grief

jgsimmons

One masterpiece after another. A fantastic, neglected album. The first volume is incredible, but how is it that this second volume is not better known? I am not surprised that this is the work of Chris Albertson, only that it has received no attention. Brilliant.

They Say All Music Guide

When producer Chris Albertson brought Lonnie Johnson and guitarist Elmer Snowden into a studio for this album on April 9, 1960, both musicians hadn’t recorded in a number of years. Indeed, Snowden hadn’t seen the inside of a studio in 26 years, but you’d never know it by the fleet-fingered work he employs on the opening “Lester Leaps In,” where he rips off one hot chorus after another. Johnson plays a dark-toned electric while Snowden plays acoustic, with Wendell Marshall rounding things out on bass. Given Johnson’s reputation as a closet jazzer, it’s remarkable that he merely comps rhythm behind Snowden’s leads on “C-Jam Blues” and “On the Sunny Side of the Street.” Johnson handles all the vocals, turning in an especially strong turn on the second take of “Stormy Weather.” Lots of studio chatter make this disc of previously unissued material a real joy to listen to, a loose and relaxed session with loads of great playing and singing to recommend it. – Cub Koda

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