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Lonnie Johnson Vol. 1 1937 - 1940

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Lonnie Johnson Vol. 1 1937 - 1940 album cover
01
Man Killing Broad
2:32
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02
Hard Times Ain't Gone No Where
2:40
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03
Flood Water Blues
2:45
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04
It Ain't What You Usta Be
2:39
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05
Swing Out Rhythm
2:39
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06
Got The Blues For The West End
2:40
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07
Something Fishy
2:41
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08
I'm Nuts Over You
2:52
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09
Friendless And Blue
3:19
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10
Devil's Got The Blues
2:57
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11
I Ain't Gonna Be Your Fool
2:51
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12
Mr. Johnson Swing
2:48
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13
New Falling Rain Blues
2:37
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14
Laplegged Drunk Again
2:45
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15
Blue Ghost Blues
3:02
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16
South Bound Backwater
2:58
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17
Why Women Go Wrong
2:57
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18
She's Only A Woman
3:05
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19
She's My Mary
3:00
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20
Nothing But A Rat
2:57
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21
Trust Your Husband
3:01
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22
Jersey Belle Blues
3:04
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23
The Loveless Love
2:53
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24
Four-O-Three Blues
3:03
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25
Be Careful
3:06
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26
I'm Just Dumb
3:00
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27
Don't Be No Fool
2:57
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 27   Total Length: 77:48

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