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Lonnie Johnson Vol. 3 (1944-1947)

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01
Some Day Baby
3:04
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02
My Love Is Down
3:12
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03
Watch Shorty
3:05
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04
Mitzy
3:19
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05
Trouble In Mind
Artist: Lonnie Johnson with Karl Jones
3:23
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06
My Last Love
Artist: Lonnie Johnson with Karl Jones
2:53
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07
Keep What You Got
2:53
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08
Solid Blues
2:49
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09
I'm In Love With You
2:55
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10
Drifting Along Blues
2:55
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11
How Could You Be So Mean
2:52
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12
Why I Love You
2:55
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13
Tell Me Why
2:55
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14
Rocks In My Bed
2:59
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15
Blues For Everybody
3:04
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16
In Love Again
2:47
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17
Blues In My Soul
2:52
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18
How Could You
2:46
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19
Love Is The Answer
2:45
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20
Don't Blame Her
Artist: Lonnie Johnson with Red nelson
3:11
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21
Your Last Time Out
2:48
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22
You Know I Do
2:44
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23
Blues For Lonnie
2:42
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 23   Total Length: 67:48

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They Say All Music Guide

Among the most obscure recordings from Lonnie Johnson’s career, the 23 selections on this CD were cut after the recording strike of 1942-1944 ended and just prior to the blues singer/guitarist joining the King label. Johnson is heard in trios (usually including pianist Blind Davis) plus on two numbers on which he backs the singing of Karl Jones. The music is (as was true throughout his career) consistently enjoyable with strong musicianship and a gentler side of the blues than was usually performed by Johnson’s country blues counterparts. Well worth exploring. – Scott Yanow