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Live

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Live album cover
01
I'm Waiting For The Man
7:02  
02
Walk On The Wild Side
5:45  
03
Sweet Jane
4:38  
04
Walk It And Talk It
3:53  
05
Berlin
5:44  
06
Sattelite Of Love
3:24  
07
Vicious
3:13  
08
White Light. White Heat
3:44  
09
Heroin
8:08  
10
I'm So Free
3:33  
Album Information
LIVE

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 49:04

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