|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

You And I

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (6 ratings)
Retail
Member
You And I album cover
01
You & I
2:26
$0.69
$0.99
02
Someone Like You
3:44
$0.69
$0.99
03
This Is One Of Those Moments
1:58
$0.69
$0.99
04
On My Own
3:16
$0.69
$0.99
05
Funny Honey
2:21
$0.69
$0.99
06
I'll Forget You
3:57
$0.69
$0.99
07
Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man Of Mine
2:16
$0.69
$0.99
08
Whistle Down The Wind
3:43
$0.69
$0.99
09
You Can Always Count On Me
3:08
$0.69
$0.99
10
Fifty Percent
2:56
$0.69
$0.99
11
Your Daddy's Son
3:50
$0.69
$0.99
12
My Own Space
2:53
$0.69
$0.99
Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 36:28

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 0 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

They Say All Music Guide

Originally released in 2005, musical theater star Louise Dearman’s debut album You and I is given a belated promotional push six years later on the back of her co-starring role as Glinda in the hit West End production Wicked, and her vocal presence on the Queen/Diana Ross covers featured on a successful insurance website/TV commercial. Following in the footsteps of Kerry Ellis’ Anthems rather than Laura Michelle Kelly’s The Storm Inside (both albums from former Wicked actresses-turned-pop stars), its 12 tracks stick rigidly to the film and show tunes she’s become highly regarded for. But while the former’s Brian May-produced effort was swamped in orchestral rock production, You and I is a more subtle and understated affair, with just a grand piano accompanying Dearman’s pure and crystal-clear vocals, giving the likes of Les Miserables standard “On My Own” and the Chess title track an intimate smoky jazz bar feel. Alongside familiar pieces from Barbra Streisand’s 1983 Academy Award-winning score Yentl, ( “This Is One of Those Moments” ), Roxie Hart‘s opening number in Chicago (“Funny Hunny”) and Kern and Hammerstein’s influential musical, Showboat (“Can’t Help Lovin’ Dat Man of Mine”), there are songs from shows she’s previously appeared in (Whistle Down the Wind‘s title theme, Jekyll and Hyde‘s “Someone Like You”), and numbers from lesser-known productions such as the troublesome 1977 Liza Minnelli Broadway hit The Act (“My Own Space”) and the short-lived 1978 musical Ballroom, based on the Emmy-winning TV drama, Queen of the Stardust Ballroom (“Fifty Percent”). It’s a shame that the album’s production isn’t as imaginative as its track-list, as although that its sparse simple arrangements allow Dearman’s star quality to shine, its basic and repetitive nature quickly wears thin. Having performed songs by the likes of Alicia Keys and the Script at her recent one-woman shows, a pop career surely beckons, but while her voice more than matches her Wicked predecessors, she’ll need to beef up her sound next time round if she’s to compete with their crossover success. – Jon O’Brien

more »