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8-Eyed Spy

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01
Diddy Wah Diddy
2:18
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02
Lazy In Love
2:55
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03
Love Split
2:10
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04
Dead Me You B Side
3:39
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05
Swamp
0:57
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06
Run Through The Jungle
5:24
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07
Motor Oil Shanty
4:28
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08
You Twist I Shout
2:29
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09
Looking For Someone
2:38
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10
Lightning's Girl
3:05
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11
Innocence
1:23
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12
Boy Meets Girl
1:55
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13
2 Square
2:34
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14
I Want Candy
2:03
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15
Ran Away Dark
1:51
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 15   Total Length: 39:49

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eMusic Features

0

Who Is…EMA

By Marissa G. Muller, Contributor

For Fans Of: Kim Gordon, Lydia Lunch, early Cat Power, Zola Jesus EMA's Erika M. Anderson doesn't fuck around. The Sioux Falls, South Dakota-born songwriter, and former frontwoman for the short-lived but cultishly-adored outfit Gowns, may have flirted with expulsion from her middle school for a prank involving a dissected frog, but when it comes to her artistic life, Anderson has always maintained a zen-level focus. "If I'm going to do something," she says, "I'm going… more »

0

Say Yes to No

By Douglas Wolk, Contributor

Around 1978, a handful of bands in downtown New York City who all knew each other tried to answer the central question of post-punk: "why does rock music have to sound a certain way?" The groups that came to be identified as the "no wave" scene rejected every kind of orthodoxy of pop music, from tunefulness to conventional instrumental skill - what the Ramones and other punk bands were doing, by contrast, was practically bourgeois… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Another chunk of Atavistic’s long-overdue retrospective of Lydia Lunch’s highly influential early work, 8 Eyed Spy collects the entire recorded output of Lunch’s second band. A far more overtly “musical” group than Teenage Jesus & the Jerks (which also featured Lunch and Jim Sclavunos, who switched from bass to drums for the new band), 8 Eyed Spy were no less confrontational. A modicum of actual talent and a newfound appreciation for musical forms that predate 1977 inform 8 Eyed Spy’s slightly less chaotic music, making this compilation sort of the downtown post-punk equivalent to Trout Mask Replica. Indeed, the album kicks off with a peculiarly effective deconstruction of Captain Beefheart’s early single “Diddy Wah Diddy,” joining tracks by the Strangeloves and Creedence Clearwater Revival alongside the powerful originals led by Lunch’s harsh but urgent vocals and Pat Irwin’s honk-blat-phwee saxophone. The live half of the album suffers from the same kind of beyond-lo-fi sound issues as Teenage Jesus & the Jerks, but this is in all other ways a tremendous step up. Unfortunately, 8 Eyed Spy broke up after barely a year when bassist George Scott died, and they were never able to fulfill the promise of these early recordings. – Stewart Mason

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