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Smoke In The Shadows

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (21 ratings)
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Smoke In The Shadows album cover
01
Hangover Hotel
2:03
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02
Smoke In The Shadows
4:53
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03
Johnny Behind The Deuce
3:09
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04
I Love How You...
3:12
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05
Touch My Evil
4:38
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06
Lost World
3:28
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07
Sway
4:16
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08
Gone City
2:19
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09
Blame
4:01
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10
Pass Like Night
5:26
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11
Portrait Of The Minus Man
2:47
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12
Trick Baby
4:21
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13
Hot Tip
6:36
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 51:09

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Jazz Cabaret Punk

Muse8

Some good jazzy vibes and arrangements, but her constant wailing / growling / mumbling voice may be hard to endure...

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This B**ch is crazy!

Muthaphuka

I had heard Lydia Lunch on My Life with The Thrill Kill Cult's "13 above the Night" on a track called "Dirty Little Secrets". It was the kind of song you would imagine hearing at a cheesy burlesque show in the back of a low rent Vegas Casino.This album has a simialr quality, but with much more perverse lyrics - which sort of makes it more fun. Contemporary Noir for the ears would sum it up.

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Deadly delicious

OddballDance

Lydia Lunch was the singer in Teenage Jesus & the Jerks. That was in NYC in 1977 and she was 17 then. After a short spell with 8-Eyed Spy she went solo. Her first solo album was released in 1980 and was entitled “Queen Of Siam”. Like Siouxsie Sioux in London she played the femme fatale of Punk. And like her English colleague she is a great poet. Her lyrics are more explicit than Siouxsie's. “He said sister you got the wrong man/ I spit right up in that motherfucker's face/ and said... every man's the wrong man”, runs a line in “Hot Tip”. “Watch this little pussy flip you off / and then just walk away”, she sings in “Trick Baby”. “Got me so doped up with your sex magick / now I'm lusting for your blood”, she threatens some guy in the title track. The music however got slower through the years but it is still light years away from mainstream. The whole album has a bar room jazz atmosphere, but it isn't easy-listening. It's very groovy, very delicious.

eMusic Features

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Who Is…EMA

By Marissa G. Muller, Contributor

For Fans Of: Kim Gordon, Lydia Lunch, early Cat Power, Zola Jesus EMA's Erika M. Anderson doesn't fuck around. The Sioux Falls, South Dakota-born songwriter, and former frontwoman for the short-lived but cultishly-adored outfit Gowns, may have flirted with expulsion from her middle school for a prank involving a dissected frog, but when it comes to her artistic life, Anderson has always maintained a zen-level focus. "If I'm going to do something," she says, "I'm going… more »

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Say Yes to No

By Douglas Wolk, Contributor

Around 1978, a handful of bands in downtown New York City who all knew each other tried to answer the central question of post-punk: "why does rock music have to sound a certain way?" The groups that came to be identified as the "no wave" scene rejected every kind of orthodoxy of pop music, from tunefulness to conventional instrumental skill - what the Ramones and other punk bands were doing, by contrast, was practically bourgeois… more »

They Say All Music Guide

While the press materials tout Smoke in the Shadows as Lydia Lunch’s “return” to her classic Queen of Siam persona, that assertion is basically erroneous. The truth is, Lydia Lunch has upped the musical ante once more. Much of the material here comes right out of the nocturnal brand of West Coast cinema jazz that accompanied the soundtracks to Farewell My Lovely, The Big Sleep, They Live By Night, and In a Lonely Place as well as countless noir B movies. Lunch employs a stellar band this time out that includes guitarists Nels Cline and Tommy Grenas, drummer Alex Cline, saxophonists Vinny Golia and Niels Van Hoorn (from the Legendary Pink Dots), keyboardist Len del Rio, Terry Edwards, and backing vocalists Adele Bertei (Contortions) and Carla Bozulich (Geraldine Fibbers). That said, the jazz here is far more deliberate and intimate; the big-band cuts like “Hangover Hotel,” “Johnny Behind the Deuce,” and “I Love You Now” feature Lunch offering a spoken/sung narrative that moves into the music accompanying her and never rises above it. The focus is on the entire proceeding, not on her with instrumental backing. Elsewhere, on “Blame,” a shimmering minimal hip-hop rhythm track is ornamented with reverbed saxophones and what sounds like a Wurlitzer. Lunch offers a paean to broken love that is alternately tender, empathetic, stylish, and taut emotional drama, like a length of cord beginning to fray. The swirling piano line and out sax fills that kick off “Touch My Evil” become a rap track with layered loops and drum lines. It’s gritty, funky, and in the pocket. When a brief vibes solo breaks into the horn-drenched chorus and an Afro-Cuban rhumba, the lid comes off. It’s the most adventurous cut on the set and its groove is faultless for all of its chameleon shape-shifting. It is followed by a revamped funky hip-hop joint called “Lost World,” which keeps its fangs bared throughout. Smoke in the Shadows is compelling from start to finish. The musical and textural landscapes bleed into and feed off of one another, and Lunch — as poet, narrator, and singer — is at the top of her darkly lyrical game. If any comparison can be made to Queen of Siam at all, it is simply that this outing is her finest musical moment since that time. Highly recommended. – Thom Jurek

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