|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Mamie Smith Vol. 1 (1920-1921)

Rate It! Avg: 5.0 (4 ratings)
Retail
Member
Mamie Smith Vol. 1 (1920-1921) album cover
01
That Thing Called Love (7275)
3:13
$0.49
$0.99
02
You Can't Keep A Good Man Down
3:19
$0.49
$0.99
03
Crazy Blues
3:22
$0.49
$0.99
04
It's Right Here For You
2:54
$0.49
$0.99
05
Fare Thee Honey Blues
2:45
$0.49
$0.99
06
The Road Is Rocky
3:05
$0.49
$0.99
07
Mem'ries Of You Mammy
3:17
$0.49
$0.99
08
If You Don't Want Me Blues
3:19
$0.49
$0.99
09
Don't Care Blues
3:01
$0.49
$0.99
10
Lovin' Sam From Alabam
2:45
$0.49
$0.99
11
Royal Garden Blues (Instrumental)
3:08
$0.49
$0.99
12
Shim-Me-King's Blues (Instrumental)
3:11
$0.49
$0.99
13
Jazzbo Ball
3:00
$0.49
$0.99
14
What Have I Done?
3:03
$0.49
$0.99
15
That Old Thing Called Love (7790) (Instrumental)
3:17
$0.49
$0.99
16
Old Time Blues (Instrumental)
2:58
$0.49
$0.99
17
Baby, You Made Me Fall For You (Instrumental)
3:27
$0.49
$0.99
18
You Can'y Keep A Good Man Down (Instrumental)
3:17
$0.49
$0.99
19
Frankie Blues
3:01
$0.49
$0.99
20
"U" Need Some Lovin' Blues
1:48
$0.49
$0.99
21
Dangerous Blues
3:17
$0.49
$0.99
22
Daddy, Your Mama Is Lonesome For You
2:58
$0.49
$0.99
23
I Want A Jazzy Kiss
2:54
$0.49
$0.99
24
Sax-O-Phoney Blues
2:51
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 24   Total Length: 73:10

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 2 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

A really fun find for jazz/blues lovers!

KristiMyers

If you love old jazz and blues from the 1920s/1930s, check out this and the other three volumes of Mamie Smith sides. The transfers are really good and listenable, and she has a voice as good as Bessie Smith. I was surprised at how nice these recordings have held up over the years, and Mamie's voice was a nice addition to my collection. In fact, I chose Vols 1 and 2 over a Bessie Smith collection this month. And that says a lot.

user avatar

MAMIE

PeterBonde

singer Mamie Smith a star of the musical revue "Maid of Harlem" had the right stuff to reach the African-American audience. Their first try was a couple of Perry Bradford pop songs with a slight Jazz and Blues feel "That Thing Called Love" and "You Can't Keep a Good Man Down". The "A" side was a Perry Bradford song called "Crazy Blues", and on the flip side was "It' s Right Here for You".

They Say All Music Guide

In 1995, Document Records devoted four CDs to the complete recorded works of legendary cabaret vocalist Mamie Smith. In the words of multi-instrumentalist Garvin Bushell, “Mamie Smith wasn’t a real blues singer like Bessie Smith. She didn’t get in between the notes like Bessie did. Mamie was what we called a shouter. But the white people called it blues!” A native of Cincinnati OH, Mamie Robinson came up in traveling variety shows, landed in Harlem in 1912 and obtained her second surname by marrying one William Smith, a theatrical tenor professionally known as Sweet Singing Smitty. One night in early 1920, William asked pianist Willie “The Lion” Smith to put together a band to accompany Mamie during an Okeh recording session at the General Phonograph Corporation on West 45th Street, in a time slot initially reserved for Sophie Tucker. The Lion went and heard Smith in performance at Digg’s Cafe, noted that “she was O.K.” and set about organizing a quintet using part of the house band at the Orient, a nightclub on 135th Street between Lenox and Fifth Avenues. The first group ever to record as Mamie Smith’s Jazz Hounds consisted of The Lion, clarinetist Ernest Sticky Elliott, either Addington Major or Ed Cox on cornet, and trombonist Ward “Dope” Andrews, who had recorded with Noble Sissle and James Reese Europe in 1919; Andrews had a very talented and famous nephew in trumpeter Charlie Shavers. Partly because it was believed that the recording equipment wouldn’t pick up the string bass and couldn’t handle a full drum kit, the addition of violinist Leroy Parker was deemed sufficient to complete the ensemble. On February 14, 1920 this unit recorded “You Can’t Keep a Good Man Down” and “That Thing Called Love”, employing a subdued style that was typical of theater pit orchestras throughout New York. Conflicting theories abound as to the actual identity of this group; its rather staid accompaniments have led Brian Rust and others to conclude that it was really an unidentified white studio ensemble. Perhaps a more accurate assessment would take into account similar-sounding records made during this period by African American groups under the leadership of Wilbur Sweatman, W.C. Handy, James P. Johnson, and Fletcher Henderson.
Many of this singer’s earliest recordings used material composed by Perry Bradford, a rather aggressive businessman who acted as her band’s manager and conductor. It was Bradford who named them the Jazz Hounds. “Crazy Blues” has often been cited by jazz historians as the first record that proved to the people running the racially segregated recording industry that African American artists were capable of generating hit records; that a paying clientele existed for such stuff, and that money could apparently be made by selling any record with the word “blues” in the title. Within one month of its release “Crazy Blues” had sold 10,000 units and Mamie Smith had broken the color bar while helping Okeh get established as a viable recording enterprise. The melody was initially called “Harlem Blues,” and like James P. Johnson’s “Mama’s and Papa’s Blues” of 1916, had its roots in a bawdy old cathouse number called “Baby, Get That Towel Wet.” The flipside, “It’s Right Here for You” was revisited by young Tommy Dorsey in 1928 (on his first session as a leader, blowing trumpet) and by Eddie Condon’s band in 1939. Smith’s original vocal take stands as a pleasant prelude to those masterful cover versions. While Bradford and a pushy specimen named Ocie Wilson each tried to oust the other so as to prevail as Mamie Smith’s manager, the Jazz Hounds were largely directed by Memphis cornetist Johnny Dunn throughout most of the period covered by this album, with appearances by clarinetist Buster Bailey, trombonist Herb Fleming, pianist Phil Worde, xylophonist Mort Perry, and tuba tackler Chink Johnson. Dunn conducted the Jazz Hounds at the Lafayette Theater while perched on a high stool with horn in hand. For those who would like to savor the sounds of the Jazz Hounds without Mamie Smith, the instrumental tracks on Volume 1 are “Royal Garden Blues,” “Shim-Me-King’s Blues,” a remake of “That Thing Called Love,” “Old Time Blues,” “Baby, You Made Me Fall for You,” and “You Can’t Keep a Good Man Down.” The final three tracks on this collection find Mamie Smith backed by a group of white men led by saxophonist Joseph Samuels, which accounts for the title “Sax-O-Phoney Blues.” – arwulf arwulf

more »