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Twi-Life

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (16 ratings)
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Twi-Life album cover
01
Oriental Folk Song
5:41
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02
The Beast Within Beauty
7:54
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03
Thump & Cadence
10:10  
04
An Oasis of Bronze
5:14
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05
Sesame Street
9:19
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06
Smoothie
5:32
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07
Brooklyn Street Fair
10:20  
08
The Whole Page
6:40
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09
Majesty
3:30
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10
Shift
3:59
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11
Haile Selassie
6:24
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12
In Faith
6:58
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13
the Nottage Cottage
6:35
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14
Moon Ruler
7:38
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15
Glitch
5:37
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16
Paradigm
5:51
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17
Twi-Life
7:56
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 17   Total Length: 115:18

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JazzR-4

Twi-Life is a 2-CD tour de force from one of today's finest young saxophonists playing with two dynamite rhythm sections, both of which feature the distinctive talents of pianist Robert Glasper. The first is acoustic, the second is "electric" with the addition of 2005 Thelonious Monk International Jazz Award winner Lage Lund. While the compositions don't necessarily conform to the dual settings, they are all marked by uncompromising standards and palpable excitement. Highlights include the hard-charging version of Wayne Shorter's "Oriental Folk Song," powered by the throbbing bass of Vincent Archer, the irresistible melody of "Shift" and the rising tension of the melody-go-round "Thump & Cadence." Throughout it all, Strickland's tone is pure, even in the most challenging passages.

They Say All Music Guide

After two albums (At Last and Brotherhood) as bandleader of a quintet of precocious jazz talents, Marcus Strickland returns with Twi-Life, an independently released, ambitious double-disc set which finds Strickland working with two separate quartets and soundscapes. The first disc features his acoustic quartet playing seven originals and Wayne Shorter’s classic “Oriental Folk Song.” The quartet (brother E.J. Strickland, pianist Robert Glasper and bassist Vicente Archer) is a cohesive clan of young musicians that represent the best of their peers on their respective instruments. The result is some inspired interplay that bolsters Strickland’s already unique writing voice, one that is both lyrical (“Brooklyn Street Fair”) and rhythmic (“Thump and Cadence”). Other times, as on “Beast Within the Beauty,” a simultaneously mean and pretty tune with Strickland employing his soprano and tenor sax — Strickland exhibits his keen ear for both melody and bounce. The second set introduces his newer quartet, where Marcus and Strickland are joined by Lage Lund (guitar) and Brad Jones (electric bass). (It’s interesting to note than many of today’s younger musicians are beginning to take this same approach, separating acoustic bands and material with their fusion counterparts.) Strickland’s second set has a decidedly more commercial appeal and evokes a sound that may turn off a few aficionados, but the musicianship can’t be denied; nor can Strickland’s inclination to explore be frowned upon when today’s music is often stale. If the direction of jazz is being steered by young musicians like Strickland, there is reason for optimism. – Vincent Thomas

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