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Pyramid of the Sun (Bonus Track Version)

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (45 ratings)
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Pyramid of the Sun (Bonus Track Version) album cover
01
Who Can Find the Beast?
2:34
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02
Pyramid Of The Sun
4:37
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03
We Got The System To Fight The System
4:15
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04
They'll No More Suffer From Thirst
4:54
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05
Ruins
2:56
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06
They’ll No More Suffer From Hunger
6:28
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07
Oaxaca
8:14
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08
Bye M’Friend, Goodbye
6:38
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09
Pyramid Of The Moon
8:46
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10
Pyramid Of The Moon (The Field Remix) [Bonus Track]
8:26
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 57:48

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A bit flat

StickGandhi

This sounds like a more generic, rockier version of modern krautrock/synth groups like Zombi or Trans Am.

user avatar

Interesting find

takku

Meditative, slightly trance-inducing instrumental music. Thick, layered synths (kind of sound like my own experiemnts with Native Instruments soft synth ten years ago), heavily processed guitars, and loop-like drum patterns. Sounds kind of like Learning to Fly era Pink Floyd minus the vocals, or early 80's Jan Hammer. I was surprised to learn that this is an actual live band with real instruments, not just something that exists in the studio or someone's laptop computer. Check it out!

They Say All Music Guide

Like fellow post-instrumental bands named after sports cars (Delorean and Trans Am, for instance), Maserati makes galloping instrumentals that are atmospheric but punchy. The band recorded Pyramid of the Sun over the course of 2009 and 2010, using vintage gear like Moog keyboards and Roland Space Echoes to give it an authentic space rock sound. A straight play, from start to end, the album thrives on the hypnotic rhythmic drive of Krautrockers like Neu!, with bulky synth riffs that make many of the songs sound like the intro to Van Halen’s version of “Dancing in the Streets,” or Jan Hammer’s “Theme from Miami Vice,” only beefed up, elongated, and entangled in guitar delays. It’s the kind of music that seems perfect for a soundtrack, or better yet, a car commercial. – Jason Lymangrover

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