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Grand Declaration Of War

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (27 ratings)
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Grand Declaration Of War album cover
01
A Grand Declaration Of War
4:14
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02
In The Lies Where Upon You Lay
5:59
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03
A Time To Die
1:48
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04
View From Nihil (pt. I of II)
3:04
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05
View From Nihil (pt. II of II)
1:16
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06
A Bloodsword And A Colder Sun (pt. I of II)
0:33
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07
A Bloodsword And A Colder Sun (pt. II of II)
4:27
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08
Crystalized Pain In Deconstruction
4:09
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09
Completion In Science Of Agony (pt. I of II)
9:44
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10
To Daimonion (pt. I of III)
3:25
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11
To Daimonion (pt. II of III)
4:52
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12
To Daimonion (pt. III of III)
0:07
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13
Completion In Science Of Agony (pt. II of II)
2:14
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 45:52

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What He Said

headbangingteacher

I accuse The Accuser from The Dead Zone of being dead on here. For extreme music fans who like their music unconventional, for black metal fans who like any form of blackened metal, and for metal fans who want to, but can't get into black metal...this may just be the perfect album for you. The production here is really slick, providing a thick layer of sludge, grime, and crunch to the guitars. Of course, with Hellhammer on drums, you will constantly feel like you are in line with the marching band of the apocalypse. Do not download anything less than the full album, as the start to finish experience is required to fully absorb its vision and flow. This is undoubtedly one of those albums which has no predecessors, and will have no followers.

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Hugely Underrated And Misunderstood

TheAccuser

The reaction this album provoked in the black metal scene at the time of its release was the sort of thing one might expect if the band members had personally gone to the homes of their confused fans and defecated in their cereal just before breakfast. It seemed everyone with a black shirt and inverted cross came out of the woods to hurl ridiculous accusations at Mayhem, but the precise, cold, militaristic, Nietszchean industrial-tinged black war metal of this album found immediate favor with those tired of cliches. So what was all the fuss about? The clean production was one major complaint. The (very sparse and minimal) use of industrial/electronic parts was another. And then there were those vocals--forget anything you may have heard about there being "rap" on this album; vocalist Maniac alternates his black metal voice with sections of clear-but-accusatory rallying war speech and it works incredibly well here.

eMusic Features

7

Neither Norway: Black Death and Afterlife

By Lenny Kaye, Contributor

I was warned. "Watch out for the death metal," said my muso friends when I told them I was off to the wilds of Norway for a rock festival – as if I could somehow be mortally wounded by shards of satanic shrapnel. But when I arrived in Bergen, on the west coast of the country, supposedly the wettest place in Europe with over 200 days of rain each year, the sun shone brightly and… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Truth be told, the vast majority of death metal artists are no more harmful than Vincent Price and Edgar Allen Poe were; they might be fascinated with the dark side and talk about it convincingly, but they aren’t really living the evil they focus on. Mayhem, however, is another matter; its members took their obsession with evil and darkness to the extreme in the 1990s, when a murder, a suicide, an act of cannibalism, and a variety of satanic, anti-Christian activity all became part of the Norwegian headbangers’ disturbing history. Not surprisingly, Mayhem is extremely controversial and has received a great deal of bad publicity in Europe, which hasn’t prevented it from maintaining a loyal cult following. If anything, all that negative publicity has helped Mayhem sell albums; in some cases, people who aren’t necessarily big death metal fans have bought their albums out of morbid curiosity (just as some of the people who went out and bought 2Pac Shakur’s albums after his murder weren’t necessarily big gangsta rap fans — they just wanted to hear what all of the fuss was about). Mayhem’s infamous history, however, shouldn’t obscure the fact that it is one of the best bands in the death metal field. Personnel changes and all, Mayhem has outdone itself with the epic Grand Declaration of War, which could arguably be described as death metal’s equivalent of Queensryche’s Operation: Mindcrime. This isn’t to say that Mayhem sounds anything at all like Queensryche, only that this conceptual album is a lot more elaborate, musical, challenging, and complex than a death metal release would ordinarily be. With Grand Declaration of War, you won’t be picking out your favorite tracks; this CD must be approached as a single body of work, and to fully appreciate it, one needs to listen to it from start to finish without interruption. Grand Declaration of War, Rovi – Alex Henderson

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