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Heaven & Hell

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Heaven & Hell album cover
Disc 1 of 2
01
Hard To Be Human
3:56   $0.99
02
Ghosts Of American Astronauts
3:43   $0.99
03
Where Were You
2:41   $0.99
04
Hello Cruel World
3:15   $0.99
05
Millionaire
4:35   $0.99
06
Chivalry
3:46   $0.99
07
Memphis Egypt
3:33   $0.99
08
Oblivion
3:10   $0.99
09
Work All Week
3:00   $0.99
10
The Olde Trip To Jerusalem
4:16   $0.99
11
(Sometimes I Feel Like) Fletcher Christian
4:37   $0.99
12
Hate Is The New Love
2:53   $0.99
13
Neglect
4:00   $0.99
14
Last Dance
3:11   $0.99
15
My Song At Night
3:27   $0.99
16
Empire Of The Senseless
4:35   $0.99
Disc 2 of 2
01
Curse
3:41   $0.99
02
Big Zombie
3:20   $0.99
03
He Beat UP His Boyfriend
2:08   $0.99
04
One Horse Dub
4:23   $0.99
05
Snow
2:42   $0.99
06
Brutal
4:34   $0.99
07
The Building
2:20   $0.99
08
Prince of Darkness
3:47   $0.99
09
(A Dancing Master Such As) Mr. Confess
6:02   $0.99
10
Poxy Lips
3:10   $0.99
11
Out In The Night
3:29   $0.99
12
Dancing In The Head
2:55   $0.99
13
Johnny Miner
2:39   $0.99
14
Insignigicance
3:46   $0.99
15
This Sporting Life
6:10   $0.99
16
Never Been In A Riot
1:44   $0.99
Album Information

Total Tracks: 32   Total Length: 115:28

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eMusic Features

1

Six Degrees of Gang of Four’s Entertainment!

By Ira Robbins, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

1

Six Degrees of Gang of Four’s Entertainment!

By Ira Robbins, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »