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Starting All Over Again

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (15 ratings)

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Starting All Over Again album cover
01
Don't Mess With My Money, My Honey, Or My Woman
3:39  
02
Starting All Over Again
4:08  
03
I May Not Be What You Want
3:05  
04
Carry Me
3:47  
05
Free For All
2:39  
06
Heaven Knows
3:51  
07
Wrap It Up
2:23  
08
What's Your Name
2:53  
09
I'm Your Puppet
2:59  
10
Too Much Wheelin' And Dealin'
2:48  
11
Forever In A Day
4:37  
12
It's Those Little Things That Count
3:06  
13
The Same Folk
3:24  
14
Yes We Can-Can
4:11  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 47:30

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Sweet Soul Music

FLBluesFan

This is a really terrific album for anyone who loves sweet soul music. This is reminiscent of Philly soul in the Gamble/Huff mode. Indeed, the title cut is a Hall and Oates song, and it's outstanding. The entire album is well-produced and the artist's singing is first rate. If you're yearning for the sound of Philadelphia International Records, download this and you won't be disappointed.

They Say All Music Guide

Mel & Tim were a classic Chicago soul vocal duo, recording in Muscle Shoals in the deep South for Stax and making records that fit comfortably next to those made in Philadelphia. It may sound incongruous, but their 1972 album, Starting All Over Again — released on CD with four bonus tracks — is a wonderful record that blends the sweet production of Philly with tight southern rhythms and Windy City harmony. And that’s not even mentioning an impeccable set of songs; many written or co-written by Phillip Mitchell, along with sharp covers of soul classics like “Wrap It Up” and “I’m Your Puppet.” The title track is a stone masterpiece — an epic tale of a couple trying to repair their love — but the rest of the album isn’t far behind. In fact, it ranks as one of the finest soul albums of the early ’70s. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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