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OPERATION: DOOMSDAY (Complete)

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OPERATION: DOOMSDAY (Complete) album cover
Disc 1 of 2
01
The Time We Faced Doom (Skit)
2:07
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02
Doomsday feat. Pebbles The Invisible Girl
5:00
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03
Rhymes Like Dimes feat. DJ Cucumber Slice
4:21
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04
The Finest feat. Tommy Gunn
4:03
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05
Back In The Days (Skit)
0:47
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06
Go With The Flow
3:39
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07
Tick, Tick... feat. MF Grimm
4:07
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08
Red And Gold feat. King Ghidra
4:45
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09
The Hands Of Doom (Skit)
1:52
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10
Who You Think I Am? feat. K.D., King Ghidra, Kong, Megalon, Rodan, X-Ray
3:26
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11
Doom, Are You Awake? (Skit)
1:15
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12
Hey!
3:49
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13
Operation: Greenbacks feat. Megalon
3:48
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14
The Mic feat. Pebbles The Invisible Girl
3:04
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15
The Mystery Of Doom (Skit)
0:24
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16
Dead Bent
2:24
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17
Gas Drawls
3:46
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18
? feat. Kurious
3:11
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19
Hero v.s. Villain (Epilogue) feat. E. Mason
2:59
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Disc 2 of 2
01
Dead Bent (Original 12" Version)
3:17
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02
Gas Drawls (Original 12" Version)
3:58
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03
Hey (Original 12" Version)
4:08
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04
Greenbacks (Original 12" Version)
3:58
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05
Go With The Flow feat. Sci.Fly (Original 12" Version)
3:43
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06
Go With The Flow (Raw Rhymes)
3:43
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07
I Hear Voices Pt. 1 (Original 12" Clean Version)
2:52
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08
I Hear Voices Pt. 2 feat. MF Grimm (Original 12" Clean Version)
2:07
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09
Tick, Tock (Original 12" Main Mix Version)
4:25
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10
? (Extended Raw Rhymes Version)
3:46
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11
Dead Bent (Original 12" Instrumental Version)
3:16
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12
Gas Drawls (Original 12" Instrumental Version)
2:53
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13
Hey! (Original 12" Instrumental Version)
3:56
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14
Greenbacks (Original 12" Instrumental Version)
3:58
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15
The Mic (Original 12" Instrumental)
3:03
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16
Red And Gold (Original 12" Instrumental)
5:08
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17
I Hear Voices (Original 12" Instrumental Version)
2:55
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18
Doomsday (Instrumental)
4:59
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19
Rhymes Like Dimes (Instrumental)
2:11
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20
The Finest (Instrumental)
4:22
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21
The Hands Of Doom (Instrumental)
2:04
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22
Who You Think I Am (Instrumental)
2:10
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23
? (Instrumental)
2:38
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 42   Total Length: 138:17

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Wondering Sound

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Christopher R. Weingarten is a freelance music writer living in Brooklyn, whose work can currently be seen in The Village Voice, Spin, Revolver, NYLON, and much...more »

04.15.11
A revered New York rapper returns with a cult classic — and a metal face.
2011 | Label: Metalface Records / Now Again Records

A certified cult classic (and one of the best subway-listening records ever), MF DOOM's Operation Doomsday is the essential release in the rapidly expanding catalog of one of underground hip-hop's most uncompromising originals. Zev Love X, of darkly humorous '90s NYC crew KMD, practically disappeared for five years (due to the death of his brother/bandmate and Elektra shelving the last KMD album) and emerged in 1999 as the mysterious, mask-clad MF DOOM, swearing "revenge against… read more »

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At last!

slothedog

This is one of my fave Hip Hop albums of all time. Get it get it get it!

user avatar

Real Niceeeee!!!

Theoside

I have to agree, this one is one of the best! This album used to be out of print and on sale for about $100 on amazon.

user avatar

Doesn't get any better than this!

MetalFaceBrewery

One of the dopest albums of all time.

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They Say All Music Guide

Simultaneously hailed as an underground classic and cast aside as poorly produced backpack rap, Operation: Doomsday inaugurated the reign of MF Doom in underground rap from the early to mid-2000s. The pretext for the album is very similar to that of Marvel Comics supervillain Dr. Doom; after MF Doom, then known as Zevlove X, had been devastated by the death of his brother and K.M.D. accomplice, DJ Sub-Roc, in the early ’90s, Elektra dropped his group and stopped the release of its second album, Black Bastards, due to its political message and, more specifically, its cover art. Doom was left scarred with a lingering pain that didn’t manifest until the late ’90s as hip-hop’s only masked supervillain on Bobbito Garcia’s Fondle ‘Em Records. Carrying the weight of the past on his shoulders, Doom opens and closes Operation: Doomsday with frank and sincere lyrics. In between, however, many of the villain’s rhymes are rather hard and piercing. On his subsequent material, he developed a more steady and refined delivery, but on this debut, Doom was at his rawest and, lyrically, most dexterous. The out-of-left-field edge of Doom’s production — which features ’80s soul and smooth jazz mixed with classic drum breaks — is indeed abstract at times, but his off-kilter rhymes are palatable and absent any pretentiousness. In fact, the album arguably contains some of the freshest rhymes one might have heard around the time of its release. There are more than enough obscure but fun references (i.e. “quick to whip up a script like Rod Serling” on “Go with the Flow” or “MCs, ya style needs Velamints” on “Dead Bent”) and quotable jewels from the “on-the-mike Rain Man” to feed on. Nevertheless, one would be hard-pressed to overlook the low-budget mixing that mars some of the LP’s presentation. For the hardcore Doom fans, the recorded-in-the-basement quality is appealing and representative of his persona as the underdog who “came to destroy rap.” In contrast, given his contributions to hip-hop during the 2000s, the masked villain offers this explanation on “Doomsday”: “Definition: supervillain/A killer who loves children/One who is well-skilled in destruction as well as buildin’.” Even though this album is certainly not for everyone, you can easily respect from where the man is coming. – Cyril Cordor

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