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Move Me

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (27 ratings)
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Move Me album cover
01
You Move Me
5:37
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02
Beneath a Spielberg Sky
4:54
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03
Words
3:44
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04
Strong
4:45
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05
Let Me Go
4:54
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06
Alone
5:12
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07
Monster
3:03
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08
Absolution Sometime!
4:59
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09
Refugee Song
5:19
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10
Four
4:47
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11
Somebody
5:50
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 53:04

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Unkaphaed

Midge Ure's career has been interesting, to say the least. Early on, he primarily worked with groups like the Rich Kids, Visage, and Ultravox, forming and shaping the New Romantic movement. After Ultravox, his singer-songwriter solo albums may not have made an impression on the US audience, but he continues to this day to release albums and tour. Move Me is arguably the most Ultravox-like solo album to date (ignoring Re*Live, where he recreates Ultravox tunes on stage using updated computer technology), and stands up to repeated playings. He may not be able to belt out "Vienna" like he used to when he was younger, but his voice has matured and, like all the best vocalists, he knows how to use his vocal talents to sound his best. Move Me does not disappoint.

They Say All Music Guide

Move Me finds Midge Ure moving seamlessly into the role of a pop/rock elder statesman without sacrificing any of the emotion and fervor of his earlier recordings, both as a solo artist and a member of Ultravox. The album is an amalgamation of Ure’s most enduring traits: strong songwriting, soaring melodies, impassioned vocals, tight arrangements, and engaging lyrics. Synthesizers, electronics, and guitars play a prominent role on every track, however, Ure is able to sidestep the 1980s retro label that many of his contemporaries get stuck in by striking an aural balance between taste and overkill. If there is an underlying theme to this record, it’s about growing older and coming to grips with life’s seemingly never-ending search for happiness and spiritual fulfillment. Touching on a myriad of subjects, from the political climate of Kosovo in the late ’90s (“Refugee Song”), America’s obsession with bigness (“Spielberg Sky”), to isolation (“Alone”) and a yearning for companionship (“Somebody” and “Strong”), Ure is a restless soul that is not about to go quietly into the night. The album’s lone instrumental track, “Monster,” is a Fatboy Slim-meets-Led Zeppelin sendup worthy of the legendary heavy metal mock-u-mentary band Spinal Tap. This is not necessarily the album to introduce the uninitiated to Midge Ure, but it is a praiseworthy addition to his catalog, and gradually grows on the listener. – Tom Semioli

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