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Rayon Hula

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (3 ratings)
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Rayon Hula album cover
01
Mele Manu - Ho'okani Pila
8:05
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02
Musa Shiya
2:59
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03
Kokoke Nalu
3:39
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04
Rayon Hula
2:14
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05
Ho'omanau Nui
1:57
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06
Paumalu (Sunset Beach)
6:25
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07
Typhoon Lagoon
3:09
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08
Mika Ohe
3:00
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09
Caught Inside (For Daniel Duane)
2:57
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10
Alohabama
2:20
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11
The New Urban Slide - The Tiki Bar is Closed
6:39
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 43:24

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Great Stuff

vanillallinav

I bought this on CD direct from Mike Cooper a few years ago after reading a rave review in the Wire (was it by David Toop perhaps). Little surprise it was picked up by a label and given a proper release because it's an absolute belter of an album. BTW the "They Say" review above is for a Marina Rosenfeld record, not Mike Coopers' Rayon Hula.

They Say All Music Guide

If being a fan of Marina Rosenfeld is not a full-time occupation (she releases little music), it sure is a fulfilling one (what she does release is top-shelf material). Plastic Materials features tracks composed between 2007 and 2009, mostly on her own, although Raz Mesinai (computer) and Ari Fenton (trumpet) appear on “The Conversation” and Christof Kurzmann (computer) had something to do with “Sweetest Sensation.” This rather short album features two types of pieces. Most of the nine tracks are delicate ambient works constructed from vinyl surface noise, piano, and electronics. Some of these (namely “In F” and “Sweetest Sensation”) are as elegant and beautiful as any previous Rosenfeld pieces. Three tracks are quite different and have all evolved out of the same project, “Teenage Lontano,” a cover version of György Ligeti’s orchestral piece rearranged for teenage choir. Here, snippets of teenage girls’ conversations are wrapped in on themselves and arranged in a kaleidoscope of sung-spoken parts blended in with treatments. All three are fascinating vignettes and, interspersed throughout the album, they add contrast and variety. Plastic Materials is an introspective work that sits halfway between electroacoustics and experimental ambient, with some pieces displaying spikes in their otherwise delicate sonic fabric — sudden sound interventions that can be startling at times, though they do give the album a certain level of unpredictability. A strong effort. – François Couture

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