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Birth of the Cool

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Birth of the Cool album cover
01
Move
2:32
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02
Jeru
3:10
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03
Moon Dream
3:18
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04
Venus de Milo
3:09
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05
Budo
2:32
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06
Deception
2:45
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07
Godchild
3:08
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08
Boplicity
2:59
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09
Rocker
3:03
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10
Israel
2:16
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11
Rouge
3:12
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12
Dran Than Dream
3:23
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13
Four
4:02
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14
Tune Up
3:54
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15
You Don't Know What Love Is
4:22
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16
Well You Need It
5:24
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17
Yesterday
3:45
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18
Old Devil Moon
3:22
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19
The Leap
4:32
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20
When Light Are Low
3:27
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 20   Total Length: 68:15

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eMusic Features

0

Six Degrees of Can’s Tago Mago

By Michelangelo Matos, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Can’s Tago Mago

By Michelangelo Matos, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

1

Shorty Rogers and the Migration of the Cool

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

Some good music never goes out of style: Jazz fans everywhere revere the cooking hard bop of the 1950s. So why is the other big '50s trend, cool jazz, barely on modern radar? If you want to know how fresh and airy it still sounds, hear trumpeter/composer/arranger/cool exemplar Shorty Rogers on "Popo," "Didi," "Four Mothers" and "Sam and the Lady" from his first 1951 octet session: tightly arranged, swinging jazz with breezy orchestral colors, and… more »

0

Six Degrees of Loaded

By Matthew Fritch, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Loaded

By Matthew Fritch, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of The Low End Theory

By Christopher R. Weingarten, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of The Low End Theory

By Christopher R. Weingarten, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

1

Icon: Miles Davis

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

Before Bob Dylan or David Bowie or whoever else became famous for periodically reinventing themselves, Miles Davis was already at it. He first gained attention playing fast bebop trumpet with Charlie Parker, then fronted the nine-piece band that established softer cool jazz. (One of his collaborators was arranger Gil Evans, who'd go on to direct a series of orchestral LPs for Miles.) In the '50s Davis founded his first great quintet, a highly influential group… more »

1

Icon: Miles Davis

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

Before Bob Dylan or David Bowie or whoever else became famous for periodically reinventing themselves, Miles Davis was already at it. He first gained attention playing fast bebop trumpet with Charlie Parker, then fronted the nine-piece band that established softer cool jazz. (One of his collaborators was arranger Gil Evans, who'd go on to direct a series of orchestral LPs for Miles.) In the '50s Davis founded his first great quintet, a highly influential group… more »

2

The Rise and Fall of Lucky Thompson

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

A few years ago, Italian saxophonist Daniele D'Agaro was visiting Chicago, and a critic friend put on a fairly obscure record to stump him. D'Agaro listened for about three seconds, said: "Lucky." Good ears. He knows the distinctive sound of Lucky Thompson after he started hanging out in Paris and playing sumptuous tenor saxophone ballads recalling old idol Don Byas's Parisian sides. On "Solitude" and "We'll Be Together Again," from Lucky in Paris 1959, his tenor's… more »

0

Shirley Scott and the Women of the B-3

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

In 1955 or so, when Jimmy Smith was popularizing the Hammond B-3 electric organ in jazz, a Philadelphia bar owner who'd rented one coaxed Shirley Scott into giving it a try. They hit it off right away. Scott played piano, so she knew the keyboard (the B-3 has two, and two octaves of bass pedals arranged like white and black keys), and she'd played trumpet in school, so she could think like a horn player, in… more »