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Live at the 1963 Monterey Jazz Festival

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (120 ratings)

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Live at the 1963 Monterey Jazz Festival album cover
01
Waiting For Miles
0:41  
02
Autumn Leaves
11:24  
03
So What
11:20  
04
Stella by Starlight
14:35  
05
Walkin'
12:48  
06
The Theme
1:16  
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK // LIVE

Total Tracks: 6   Total Length: 52:04

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i appreciate...

josh_down

that you don't like the music dude, but don't call it a travesty. to the right ears, this music is incredible. i wouldn't say that this is the best example of this period of miles, but i still find it a fantastically enjoyable listen.

user avatar

Moldy Figs

DoctorTragus

"Just a Travesty" What?! I find it funny that there seems to be so many pro-bebop cats who would have called the dixieland set "moldy figs" because of their reluctance to open their ears and their minds to a new music, and who (then and) now whine about things being a "travesty" when they are of a more free nature. It really is too bad that some people can't just feel good music instead of complaining that it isn't what they expect. It's all music, man. Chill out, open your mind, and give it a listen.

user avatar

What am I not hearing?

Jazzoid

I read the reviews...I downloaded a couple of tracks...just to make sure my initial reaction to the 30 second previews were not wrong...listened to the downloads over a few days to give them a chance...then deleted the downloads...why would anyone want to have their ears assaulted by this noise? '40s Miles - Yes! '50s Miles - Yes! This recording is just a travesty! Sorry guys! Their maybe an interpretation of quantum mechanics that explains your views on this recording. Who knows?

user avatar

What happened to...

paulee

...Winter in Europe 1967? It's an amazing companion piece to this. Listening to them both you hear the development of the music and what the new lineup brought in. Where did it go?

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A Classic

Cannonball

This album is a classic. Great live stuff from a wonderful line-up.

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Ah one, ah two, ah one two three four...

Jacked Up Jazz

Maybe after a few more listens my exuberance will wear down, but this is now my favorite Miles Davis album. You can envision Miles strolling onto the stage, thin, dapper and not cool but ice cold. As if to warm up a bit he tootles some notes into his horn and instantaneously the band is magically ablaze. Nobody calls the tune, nobody counts it off. It is as if a shaman has cast a spell before your very ears. Knowing Miles' legendary disdain for rehearsals (Wayne Shorter talks about a phone call from Miles exhorting him to "bring your music" essentially constituting rehearsal for his first gig with the band) I imagine these tootled notes being the band's first inkling of what they were going to play. But as if by osmosis, everybody knows exactly where its at! All of this could be the product of post production editing, but I've always been the type to never let reality get in the way of a good tale.

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Didn't Think

TopCat

I didn't think that the recording would be this good and the playing is fantastic. I never thought someone would do justice to Chambers playing on "So What" but Carter certainly does - just wished I hadn't waited a couple months before downloading

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magnificent snapshot

LASERVIEW

This is a band caught at the brink of change-just before Wayne Shorter took over from George Coleman to bring the group into the mid to late 60s and from there to the final fusion bands of the 70s and beyond.Magnificent piano playing by Hancock and of course Tony Williams kept the pot boiling throughout. Great sound quality and worth downloading in full.

user avatar

yeah!

beatmeister

The band is on top of their game, on fire and swinging mightily. Nice sound quality, you can hear Ron Carter's bass, the gorgeous ride cymbal of Tony Williams, Herbie,Miles, George Coleman on tenor sax. A great transitional unit just before Wayne Shorter joined the band. A great and heretofore unavailable performance. Dig it.

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They Say All Music Guide

When John Coltrane split with Miles Davis in 1960, the trumpeter went through many different personnel combinations. Those changes included using saxophonists Sam Rivers or George Coleman before settling on Wayne Shorter, and discovering Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter, and Tony Williams to form what was one of the greatest of all modern mainstream jazz quintets. Two months after the Antibes Jazz Festival LP Miles Davis in Europe, this concert was documented at the Monterey Jazz Festival in the early fall of 1963, and it is a missing link between the struggles Davis encountered and the ultimate zenith of his last great acoustic combos. While he and Coleman are not always in sync, the rhythm section is on fire, led by a rock-solid Carter; a fertile-minded Hancock; and Williams, who was amazing even though he was only 17 years old at this juncture. The repertoire is stock and standard Miles, the tunes stretched out with witty and powerful solos, yet there is a sense of devil-may-care mischievous bravado that keeps the proceedings interesting and compelling. The preservation of the analog sound quality on reel-to-reel tapes after all these years is quite good, and though Coleman’s solos come in a bit thin when a microphone is turned on late, it’s hardly noticeable. The saxophonist himself is lively, inspired, and full-throated on his solos, a tribute to the rich, perfectly balanced voicings he has held fast to all of his career. Hancock is a case study in inventiveness, as he’s always reaching for a higher plateau with every remarkable handful of measures. Davis walks on the stage and immediately jumps into wholly improvising off the theme to “Autumn Leaves” without his legendary modal intro. The bandmembers are unrestricted, free, and loose without thinking or charting a course — they just do it with no messing around. A very fast “So What” is triple-timed from the original with Carter laying out the melody, but they don’t sound like they are rushing, primarily due to Williams starting on brushes, then switching to sticks without dropping a beat, and the fluid dynamics of the band become more evident. Hancock shines on the ballad “Stella by Starlight” as everyone solos over nearly 15 minutes, then they charge hard again on the quintessential bop vehicle “Walkin’,” a typical piece for Davis and his fans, but worth hearing for the variations and solos. Collectors and completists will want this issue, and as a bridge between the short-lived band with Rivers, the groups with Victor Feldman that produced Seven Steps to Heaven, and the legendary mid-’60s quintet, it provides an important primer toward what took the music of Davis to an even higher level. It’s easily recommended even for novices, a very good representation of Miles Davis at the forefront of mainstream modern jazz. – Michael G. Nastos

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