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Nefertiti

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01
Nefertiti
7:52
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02
Fall
6:35
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03
Hand Jive
8:54
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Madness
7:31
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Riot
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Pinocchio
5:06
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Hand Jive
6:45
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Hand Jive
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Madness
6:40
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Pinocchio
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 65:33

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Wondering Sound

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Kevin Whitehead

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Kevin Whitehead is the longtime jazz critic for NPR’s “Fresh Air” and author of Why Jazz? A Concise Guide (2011), New Dutch Swing (about improvised music in Ams...more »

06.30.09
Miles Davis, Nefertiti
1998 | Label: Columbia/Legacy

By 1967 and Nefertiti, the fourth (and last full) album by trumpeter Miles Davis's great '60s quintet, the music had gotten increasingly bizarre. On tenor saxophonist Wayne Shorter's title track, he and Miles just keep repeating the mournful short melody line over and over; there are no solos, unless you count pianist Herbie Hancock's bursts of commentary in the cracks, or drummer Tony Williams 'fireworks behind the horns. "Nefertiti"'s circular strategy worked so well, they… read more »

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miles' last "jazz" record

efresh

this and "filles de kilimanjaro" are two great overlooked records in the miles davis catalogue -- probably because they represent the transition from cutting-edge acoustic jazz of the 2nd quintet to the rock/electric experimentation of "silent way" and beyond. do not count either of these records out, they are understated gems. shorter, hancock, carter, williams -- this band is topnotch.

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Leadership

McSurfer

I cannot think of anything from Miles that I do not like. But I think this album deserves special attention, as it is another example of Davis, and the talented men he surrounds himself with, re-defining Jazz and leading the way to new interpretations of the genre.

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This is Jazz.....

HSWT

Honestly you can't go wrong with any album from Miles during this period. In my opinion this is probably Miles' most musically significant period. If anybody ever asks you to explain what Jazz is, just play them an album from this period.

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Heart of Darkness

greg6711

Deep, dark african and hot!

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Essential Miles

Drum4JC

With the depth and breadth of Miles' work, it's hard, if not impossible to narrow it down to a handful of essentials. However, this album would have to be included in that list. This album paves the way for his upcoming transformation into the fusion era. The elements are in place. Right on the edge waiting to go over. Propelled by Tony Williams' exuberance, this album just has it all.

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Always a classic

drjkraut

I first got turned onto this record many years ago by a jazz buff who had far surpassed me in his discovery of the genre - Tristano, Konitz & Marsh, collectively, were another big discovery I encountered through him. This album is filled with great material, but the title track, a gorgeous repeating theme over which drummer Tony Williams creates increasingly complex and compelling variations is a one-of-a-kind track. If you haven't gotten this one yet, waste no more time!

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EMusic PLEASE get an EDITOR

Amadeus

According to your typist, Herbie Hankock played TRUMPET, I revere him and know his talent is a jazz landmark, but PLEASE, can someone check the credits. The number and type of mistakes on E-Music should embarrass anyone.

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eMusic Features

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Six Degrees of Miles Davis’s Nefertiti

By Britt Robson, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Nefertiti, the fourth album by Miles Davis’ second classic quintet, continues the forward motion of Sorcerer, as the group settles into a low-key, exploratory groove, offering music with recognizable themes — but themes that were deliberately dissonant, slightly unsettling even as they burrowed their way into the consciousness. In a sense, this is mood music, since, like on much of Sorcerer, the individual parts mesh in unpredictable ways, creating evocative, floating soundscapes. This music anticipates the free-fall, impressionistic work of In a Silent Way, yet it remains rooted in hard bop, particularly when the tempo is a bit sprightly, as on “Hand Jive.” Yet even when the instrumentalists and soloists are placed in the foreground — such as Miles’ extended opening solo on “Madness” or Hancock’s long solo toward the end of the piece — this never feels like showcases for virtuosity, the way some showboating hard bop can, though each player shines. What’s impressive, like on all of this quintet’s sessions, is the interplay, how the musicians follow an unpredictable path as a unit, turning in music that is always searching, always provocative, and never boring. Perhaps Nefertiti’s charms are a little more subtle than those of its predecessors, but that makes it intriguing. Besides, this album so clearly points the way to fusion, while remaining acoustic, that it may force listeners on either side of the fence into another direction. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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