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Centerpiece

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Centerpiece album cover
01
Centerpiece
5:43  
02
Holy Land
5:32  
03
Smile
6:38  
04
Cherry
6:51  
05
Little Girl Blue
6:46  
06
Someday My Prince Will Come
8:26  
07
Speed Ball
7:34  
08
Blue Bossa
5:31  
09
Watch What Happens
9:22  
10
Organ Grinders Swing
6:09  
Album Information
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Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 68:32

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eMusic Features

2

The Rise and Fall of Lucky Thompson

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

A few years ago, Italian saxophonist Daniele D'Agaro was visiting Chicago, and a critic friend put on a fairly obscure record to stump him. D'Agaro listened for about three seconds, said: "Lucky." Good ears. He knows the distinctive sound of Lucky Thompson after he started hanging out in Paris and playing sumptuous tenor saxophone ballads recalling old idol Don Byas's Parisian sides. On "Solitude" and "We'll Be Together Again," from Lucky in Paris 1959, his tenor's… more »

They Say All Music Guide

The original two-record set featuring Milt Jackson at the Kosei Nenkin was reissued in condensed form on an earlier CD; this second volume includes the omitted pair of tracks as well as eight previously unreleased songs. Accompanied by tenor saxophonist Teddy Edwards, pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Ray Brown, and drummer Billy Higgins, the veteran vibraphonist gives his Tokyo audience their yen’s worth. The leader dominates the hard-charging opener, “Centerpiece,” though Walton and Edwards both get in some choice licks. Charlie Chaplin’s “Smile” seems a bit more upbeat than typically performed, but Edwards’ soulful saxophone gets the message of its bittersweet lyric across. Other standards, including “Little Girl Blue” and “Someday My Prince Will Come” (the latter song first recorded by Dave Brubeck in 1957, then in 1961 by Miles Davis; liner note writer Ed Michel has it backwards), inspire the musicians to the top of their respective games. Unfortunately, Walton’s switch to electric piano gives a rather dated sound to Don Redman’s “Cherry” and Kenny Dorham’s “Blue Bossa.” It goes without saying that anyone who picked up the original two-record set or just the companion volume to this CD should snap it up without delay. – Ken Dryden

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