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The Milt Jackson Story

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The Milt Jackson Story album cover
01
Heart and Soul
2:36  
02
The Lady Is a Tramp
7:29  
03
Opus De Funk
4:08  
04
Come Rain or Come Shine
6:48  
05
So in Love
3:13  
06
Now's the Time
8:26  
07
How High the Moon
6:14  
08
They Didn't Believe Me
3:45  
09
Wonder Why
5:27  
10
I Should Care
4:20  
11
Opus and Interlude
6:31  
12
Moonray
5:05  
13
Stonewall
7:46  
14
Can't Help Lovin' That Man
4:44  
15
The Song Is Ended
4:40  
16
Solitude
4:43  
17
Wild Man
5:47  
18
Minor Conception
8:46  
19
Sometimes I'm Happy
7:26  
20
Flamingo
3:47  
21
The Nearness of You
4:05  
22
Round About Midnight
2:59  
23
My Funny Valentine
4:42  
24
Bright Blues
6:15  
25
Medley: In a Sentimental Mood, Mood Indigo, Azure
6:54  
26
Opus Pocus
7:30  
27
What's New?
3:15  
28
They Can't Take That Away from Me
6:46  
29
Angel Face
6:48  
30
Bags' Groove
3:07  
31
You Leave Me Breathless
6:31  
32
True Blues
3:09  
33
Softly As in the Morning Sunrise
3:31  
34
Milt Meets Sid
3:09  
35
These Foolish Things
4:25  
36
Fred's Mood
6:36  
37
Red Shoes
2:23  
38
Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea
2:40  
39
On the Scene
2:45  
40
Soul in 3/4
6:53  
41
Lover
7:54  
42
Tahiti
3:30  
43
Yesterdays
2:34  
44
Lillie
3:17  
45
Fine and Dandy
2:24  
46
Bebop Blues
2:16  
47
Gerry's Blues
5:03  
48
Autumn Breeze
3:01  
49
Love Me Pretty Baby
3:43  
50
Moving Nicely
3:22  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 50   Total Length: 243:08

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eMusic Features

2

The Rise and Fall of Lucky Thompson

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

A few years ago, Italian saxophonist Daniele D'Agaro was visiting Chicago, and a critic friend put on a fairly obscure record to stump him. D'Agaro listened for about three seconds, said: "Lucky." Good ears. He knows the distinctive sound of Lucky Thompson after he started hanging out in Paris and playing sumptuous tenor saxophone ballads recalling old idol Don Byas's Parisian sides. On "Solitude" and "We'll Be Together Again," from Lucky in Paris 1959, his tenor's… more »