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Out of Step

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (297 ratings)
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Out of Step album cover
01
Betray
3:04
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02
It Follows
1:50
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03
Think Again
2:18
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04
Look Back and Laugh
3:16
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05
Sob Story
1:50
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06
No Reason
1:57
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07
Little Friend
2:18
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08
Out of Step
1:20
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09
Cashing In
3:43
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 9   Total Length: 21:36

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Minor Threat's swan song

Skydog7

You can hear the progression from their first "album" (actually 7" records) to this. There are biting guitar solos, and some songs are a bit longer than 1.5 minutes. But what's not lost is the fury, great musicianship, and Ian MacKaye's killer lyrics. No clunker on here. This album continues to ring true for me 20 years after I first bought it on vinyl.

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Can't believe I used to like these guys.

swiftus

Ian MacKaye the grandfather of EMO. What a PC puke. At least I got 40$ for my vinyl.

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Step of Out

mattalert

Liked this when I was 13. I like it 15 years later. Grab your skateboard and some friends and you'll figure the rest out.

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After all these years, it's still great

MyPod

I loved this album when I was a kid... I think I had to replace the casette 3 or 4 times...it would get eaten in a friends car stereo, or just from being worn out! I still love this album, and now, strangely, so do my.....kids. Standing the test of time. Minor Threat.

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Looking for the one with the strings?

Eightiesunderbelly

If you're like me you spent a lot of time in vain trying to find a digital version of the "Out of Step/Cashing In" that had the delicious string ensemble at the end. (That's how I heard it first and it was never quite perfect without it.) Well...thank you eMusic for finally bringing it back to me. (The "Complete Discography" inexcusably left it out.)

eMusic Features

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A Brief History of BYO Records

By Jason Pettigrew, Contributor

When put into the perspective of the history of American hardcore, the Los Angeles-based label BYO didn't make a "popular" impact: You don't hear historians referring to Mark and Shawn Stern's imprint with the same kind of reverence routinely bestowed upon such labels as Dischord and SST. But to dismiss the label as a mere footnote would be way off mark: Since BYO's 1982 launch, the Stern brothers - in their roles as founders of… more »

They Say All Music Guide

The only official album Minor Threat ever released was a mere eight songs — but that was enough. Building on the promise and fire of the band’s earlier singles, Out of Step instantly became iconic for American hardcore, not to mention for the D.C. scene, for years to come, as well as any number of bands who conflated personal and social politics. That any number of restrained turn-of-the-century emo acts could refer to songs on Out of Step as much as fiery punk’s-not-dead revivalists is demonstration enough of the record’s impact. By this point the band had moved beyond the straightforward explosions of sound that characterized the earliest numbers. Songs like “Betray” and “Little Friend” contain sudden, heart-stopping pauses, with full-bodied production that’s as much thrash metal as it is trebly punk squeal. Lyle Preslar and Brian Baker both have at the guitar this time through and do the instrument proud, creating memorable, snarling riffs that rip out of the speakers without apology. Jeff Nelson’s drumming is equally powerful, but Ian MacKaye’s outraged performance provides the real killer touch. Even if it requires the lyric sheet to catch what’s being said in particular, there’s less in the way of declarative statements of purpose and more expressions of looming worries, his conversational asides adding a touch of melancholy even at the most high-volume moments. Besides a re-recording of “Out of Step” from the In My Eyes EP, other high points include “Look Back and Laugh,” an uneasy but ever-more-tightly wound confrontation with the reality of growing apart being entangled with growing up, and the powerful “Think Again.” There’s a secret highlight, though — “Cashing In,” appearing unlisted at the end and showing that MacKaye and company had a definite sense of humor, pokes fun at their own glowering image even while rocking out with aplomb (and including, of all things, a concluding burst of strings). – Ned Raggett

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