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Legendary Grape

Rate It! Avg: 3.5 (48 ratings)
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Legendary Grape album cover
01
All My Life
3:36
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02
Nighttime Rider
3:07
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03
Give It Hell
2:55
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04
On The Dime
3:50
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05
Lady Of The Night
3:42
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06
Changing
3:05
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07
Took It All Away
3:06
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08
Bitter Wind In Tanganika
3:33
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09
Talk About Love
1:58
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10
You'll Never Know
4:15
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11
You Can Depend On Me
3:09
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12
Further On Up The Road
3:01
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13
It Don't Take Much
3:20
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14
Getting' Used To Being Treated Wrong
2:34
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15
Forty Feet Tall
4:47
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16
Forbidden Love
2:58
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17
Telephone Love
2:33
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18
Rodeo
4:14
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 18   Total Length: 59:43

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A Great Reminder

Wolf

Long Live Grape! Were it not for some colossal marketing blunders by Columbia Records at the time Moby Grape may well have been as celebrated as the Doors or Jefferson Airplane; musically they ran/run circles around both. This reunion album is good, no doubt about it -- and well worth downloading -- but for me serves more to remind me what could have been. Ulf Wolf Los Angeles

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Bitter Wind

Muddyrich

Bitter Wind In Tanganika is my download recommendation here....

They Say All Music Guide

Although credited to the Legendary Grape, this is in essence an album by a reunited Moby Grape, originally issued on a cassette-only release in 1990 by Herman Records that was credited to the Melvilles. Only 500 of those cassettes were made, and in 2003 it was reissued on CD with eight bonus tracks. It’s a curious record, and not only because of its tangled history and use of different names for a band that’s actually Moby Grape. Many of the elements that made Moby Grape distinctive in its original incarnation in the late ’60s are here. There’s the fusion of rock, blues, country, R&B, and folk along with the brisk execution, the sorrowful lead vocals and the multi-part harmonies, and the mix of tender ballads with bar band stomp. But there’s not as much substance as form, since many of the songs are basic, simplistic, and repetitive, sometimes giving off the aura of a considerably above average bar band that’s relying on original material. Generally they’re better on the reflective folk-country tunes, like “Nighttime Rider,” “Forbidden Love,” and “Rodeo,” than the uptempo tunes, which at their worst can sound like clichéd roadhouse boogie. – Richie Unterberger

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