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Shout at the Devil

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (470 ratings)

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Shout at the Devil album cover
01
In the Beginning
1:14
$0.49
02
Shout at the Devil
3:14
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03
Looks That Kill
4:07
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04
Bastard
2:53
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05
God Bless the Children of the Beast
1:30
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06
Helter Skelter
3:12
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07
Red Hot
3:21
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08
Too Young to Fall in Love
3:35
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09
Knock 'Em Dead, Kid
3:43
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10
Ten Seconds to Love
4:18
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11
Danger
3:51
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 34:58

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Take It For What It Is!

milehighnic

Shout at the Devil is a damn fine rock & roll record. even today (yes even for adults who have lives, other than bashing musicians who are doing things granolas only wish they could!) Certainly crue's finest hour.

user avatar

Oh, those word that come out of his mouth

mikemos

I too love this in Jr High. Too Young and Red Hot were my favorites. The music isn't bad for metal, like glammed up Priest. And no power ballads!! But those lyrics. I can't get past them. The first album wasn't exactly Dylan (or Iron Maiden, ,which seems more fitting) but this one is just cliche after cliche. I wish I could get past bad writing but I can't. It's just they way I listen to music.

user avatar

Epic...if you're 13 years old.

granolasandwich

Seemed so powerful in junior high, but now it sounds like a horrible joke. If you're an adult still cranking this one loud then you need to get a life.

user avatar

The Best, By Far

Satyrblade

When "Looks That Kill" came blasting out of my car radio speakers somewhere around summer 1983, I was hooked. A high-school metalhead on the cusp of transition into a college punk, I found the raw, dirty sound of this album to be the perfect synthesis of the best elements of Judas Priest, the Sex Pistols, Iron Maiden and the Ramones (excluding Rush, probably my favorite bands around that period). SHOUT is a snapshot of the best early '80s metal, before the whole genre descended into farce. Every track here kills.

user avatar

A classic but a little slicker than before

banomassa

This is an awesome album, love it start to finish. But the Crue were a little slicker and heavier than before. This is a metal classic. After this the Crue would get spotty at best. It's sort of an end of an era.

user avatar

Great album but...

acdc1

This is a great album.

user avatar

Tommmy Lee!

Shaughn

His best drums performance.

user avatar

Still Shoutin'

arfiii

This album--along with Pyromania, Metal Health, and Bark at the Moon--was one of those formative albums in my youth. It rocked my world when it first came out, and it still rocks my world when I pop it in the iPod today. In short, this is the best Crue album as far as I'm concerned. It's definitely their most "metal" album, whatever that means, and it has some of the best riffs on the decade lurking within its decadence. I think even Satan himself wouldn't be able to resist singing along to "Shout at the Devil," "Bastard," "To Young to Fall in Love," and "Danger." Here's all the dirt you need on the boys in the Crue.

user avatar

Motley Crue's best!

Geezer

I saw Crue on this tour back in the 80's. This is MC at their best. Mick Mar's guitar work is excellent. Before the more commercial albums to follow, MC created a metal classic.

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Timeless

knightcy

Raw rock and roll that should not get compared to the follower hair bands. Crue led the way!!!

They Say All Music Guide

Shout at the Devil displays Mötley Crüe’s sleazy and notorious (yet quite entertaining) metal at its best. When compared to its predecessor, Too Fast for Love, one can see that the band’s musical range certainly widened over the course of its first two albums; the record features catchy, hard-rocking songs, but also includes an instrumental (“God Bless the Children of the Beast”) and a powerful cover of the Beatles’ “Helter Skelter.” While such later albums as Dr. Feelgood would achieve a higher amount of critical acclaim, no Mötley Crüe album surpasses the quality of Shout at the Devil. [In 1999, the Crüe remastered and reissued Shout at the Devil on the band's own Motley/Beyond label with four bonus tracks: three demos, including versions of the title track and "Looks That Kill," and a previously unreleased song.] – Barry Weber

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